Tag Archives: work

Beating the stress of Redundancy

Don’t let losing your job throw you into deep difficulty. Sort out your finances early.

Being made redundant doesn’t have to throw you and your family into financial trouble, although it’s likely to knock you about to start with.  Stay on top of your finances by planning and setting a budget with the help of your financial adviser.

Know your financial status

So, why an Adviser?

Firstly, you need to know where you stand financially.  Your adviser can help you do this by looking at your savings, the size of your redundancy payments and your total expenses over the coming months.

Your adviser can also take you through the types of redundancy payments you may be eligible for and help you understand the tax implications they may have.  Some  may be best directed into superannuation to help save on tax and for retirement.

Once you have a final figure of your available funds, you and your adviser can see how it stacks up against your total expenses for the next two to three months.  This will give you clear insight into whether you’ll be in the money… or out.

Work with your adviser to set a budget

With a clear idea of your financial standing, your adviser can help you set an appropriate budget or offer suggestions on how to make ends meet.  Alternately, there’s plenty of online templates available if you want to DIY, one of my favourite sites is the ASIC MoneySmart Budget Planner.

This may help you avoid any shortfall, assuming you don’t earn any income in the next two to three months.  It may also trigger you to think of areas you can cut back on while things are tough.

Think of other ways

If cutting back on non-essential expenses is not enough to make up the shortfall, your adviser may suggest other ways you can manage your finances, including getting a part-time job.  Others decide to turn hobbies into careers, or investigate driving with Uber, doing deliveries or hiring out a room or two on Air BnB whilst looking for full-time work.

Perhaps a chat with the bank or your loan providers will be in order.

Check if you’re eligible for government assistance. Talk to your adviser about the income support payments available to you.

Get back on your feet

Look at your job loss as a temporary setback and aim to get back on your feet as soon as you can.  Maybe there’s a silver lining and things will be much better for you moving forwards.  Reach out to your financial adviser for support.  Opportunities to rejoin the workforce might be waiting just around the corner.

Try using online platforms like Seek or Indeed to job hunt.  And make sure your LinkedIn profile is up to date.  Many agencies now look at that rather than ask for a resume.

And good luck!

Returning to work? Four things to think about

There are many reasons for taking a break from the workforce: to have a baby, look after family members, or recover from a redundancy or illness. Whatever the reason, returning to work can be challenging. Here are some tips that may help give you the confidence you’re after.

1. How are your finances?

Before starting a new job, or returning to a previous role, take the opportunity to review your financial situation. Are all your bills paid? How good is your debt management? You should also update your budget to account for your new income, keeping in mind any changes in expenses such as child care, and ensuring you have savings in case of emergency. This is also a great time to think about income protection insurance.

2. Check your superannuation

Your superannuation savings may have stalled from lack of employer contributions. If you’d like to try to catch up, there are options. For example, you can salary sacrifice part of your pay or you may be eligible for the government’s co-contribution scheme.

Spouse contributions may also help, and under the superannuation reforms that came into effect on 1 July 2017, anyone with a partner who earns less than $40,000 can contribute to their super and may receive a tax offset in return.

3. Stay in touch

While you’re still on leave, there are a few things you can do to give yourself the best chance of transitioning back into the workforce successfully.

If you plan to stay in your industry or role, make sure you are up to date on the latest trends and insights. Keeping in touch with colleagues and your network is also a great way to show you are engaged in your area.

You may also take the opportunity to learn a new skill, gain experience or take a course. This may indicate to potential employers that you’re eager to continue learning. Remember to update your resume afterwards.

4. Talk to your employer

Many people returning to work will require flexible workplace arrangements, such as the ability to work from home or only for certain periods of time. Talk to your employer about this early on, then you can create an arrangement that works for both of you.

If you are seeking a new position and know you will need to work from home some days, research employers’ workplace flexibility arrangements. Is there a work-from-home policy? Is work–life balance encouraged? Seek out companies that offer these policies and keep an eye out for organisations with a return-to-work support program.

Some people find that slowly easing back into work sets up a stronger foundation for long term employment. This may mean going back one day a week, then increasing this to two, three or four days. If you think this may work for you, discuss a trial arrangement with your employer.

Return to work with confidence

Returning to work after extended leave can be daunting – but it can also be a great opportunity to develop your skills, connect with a community and achieve new goals.

Reach out to your networks and see how others managed the transtion.  There’s great groups available like Busines Chicks who offer fabulous support to their members.

There are also many financial aspects to consider, so speaking to a financial adviser who understands the latest reforms and your unique situation may give you peace of mind.  I’d love to help!

Never Work a Day in Your Life!

Have you ever heard the expression “Choose a job you love and you’ll never have to work a day in your life?”  This cliché is often attributed to Confucius, tho I’m not convinced, based on the fact that nearly everyone was probably a soldier, merchant or a farmer…

Yet, it is possible to love your work and not even think of it as ‘work,’ a ‘job,’ or a ‘chore.’ I am sure you know at least one person who is doing what they love.

Truth be told, people who do what they love even tend to look a little different. You can pick them out in a crowd. They emanate something special.

And contrary to popular opinion, No, they didn’t have it any easier than you.  What they did was make a decision to start doing what they loved.  And it’s a big step.  A giant leap in fact to let go of security and make a go of something you’ve only ever dreamed about.

Why not ask yourself what you really love that perhaps you never imagined you could turn into a profession or get paid for?  Is there a hobby you love to do on weekends that you could turn into a fantastic living?

If you love hiking, could you lead treks?  If you love writing, can you start a blog?  Or a book?  Are you creative?  Do you have paintings or craft to make a cottage business out of?

I know some people who had a life altering moment in their travels, start doing what they love and they’ve never looked back, happily turning their backs on the big bucks and corporate life to follow their dreams.

What are some small action steps you can take today? Can pick up a relevant book about your favourite topic, do a Google search to learn more, buy the domain name of that business you’ve got planned in your head?  Even ask your friends what they think you should be doing – they know you well and what lights your fire!

Following your dreams may just be easier than you think!

Start the momentum now…

Then, as Oprah phrased it “Find a way to get paid for doing what you love.  Then every pay check will be a bonus!”