Tag Archives: windfall

6 ways to get the most out of a financial windfall

Received a large sum of money? Lucky you! By taking practical steps, you can ensure your newfound wealth goes much further…

Research has shown that on average, people who receive an inheritance spend about half of it.1  So how can you be that amazing and eminently sensible one who makes sure your windfall doesn’t just vanish but helps you build a secure financial future? Here are six smart ways.

1. Set money aside

To avoid the temptation of spending it impulsively, rashly and super quickly, you could put the money away temporarily in a deposit account or short-term investment. Leaving the sum aside for one or two months may give you more time to plan, have a think about what you’d like or to engage a professional financial adviser for guidance on using the money wisely.

2. Settle debts

Using a windfall to clear debts can put you on a better financial footing. Consider working with your financial adviser to create a budget that considers all your debt obligations, income and windfall. This can also be a good chance to discuss the opportunity to invest and grow your money.

3. Grow the emergency fund

Building up your emergency fund – or creating one if you haven’t got one – can be another way to make good use of the funds. By increasing the emergency stash to cover expenses for six months, you may be better positioned to handle unexpected events such as a job loss, illness or accidents.  Working out where best to put that can also be done with the assistance of an adviser.

4. Beef up retirement savings

Making extra contributions to your superannuation may help you optimise your windfall. Whether you make non-concessional contributions or, if you are employed, arrange to have a portion of your pre-tax salary paid to your super, increasing your retirement savings can help you secure your financial future.  And don’t get me started on how compound interest can help you out here over all those years to retirement too!

5. Fund your goals

Take the opportunity to build savings for some of your personal goals, such as higher education or travelling to places on your bucket list.  Maybe consider doing this only after you’ve paid off debt and built up that emergency stash!

6. Give to others

Receiving a large windfall can be a chance to help others in need. If you decide to give some money away to those less fortunate, consider donating it to an organisation that’s entitled to receive tax-deductible gifts, so you can claim a tax deduction.  Being philanthropic feels good too!  Websites now also have to tell you how much of the money actually gets to where it’s needed and what is spent on administrative purposes.

Chances are, your future self will be pretty chuffed with you doing such great ‘adulting!’

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1. The Ohio State University, 2012, ‘Most Americans Save Only about Half of their Inheritances, Study Finds’. Available at: https://news.osu.edu/most-americans-save-only-about-half-of-their-inheritances-study-finds—ohio-state-research-and-innovation-communications/.

Managing a Financial Windfall

We’ve all got that dream – we’ll have that massive lotto win, Great-Aunty Betty will die and leave us everything… or even that a spectacular tax return or bonus will come our way.

Although they’re aren’t regular occurrences, financial windfalls can come our way now and then… so instead of blowing it all, what’s the best way to take advantage of a bonus or extra dollars that come our way?

The temptation to splurge can often be overwhelming, but your future self is hardly likely to thank you for replenishing a wardrobe or buying more “stuff” that is likely to end up in a charity bag in a year or two.  So what are some eminently sensible and grown-up ways of making that money work harder?

Here’s a few ways to spend this money that will give you long-term benefits.

  • If you have debt, especially non-deductible debt like credit cards or personal loans, pay them down first, followed closely by long-term debt like your Mortgage
  • If you’re really not sure what to do and everyone is putting their two cents worth in and confusing you ever more, put it in a high interest savings account until you can do some research and be comfortable with your decision
  • Can you put a bit extra in your super?  Retirement might be a long way off, but that means you have the benefit of long term compounding interest in your favour
  • Is there enough for you to start investing?  It may be worth kicking off a portfolio of shares, property or managed funds if there’s enough.
  • Getting financial advice can be of great benefit.  Financial professionals often have access to funds and research that are unavailable to many and they can ensure that you invest in line with your risk profile, not putting ‘all your eggs in one basket.’
  • Have you put off personal protection strategies like income protection, trauma cover or health insurance?  It may be worth investing in looking after yourself
  • Have you considered taking time out and learning new skills?  Maybe it’s time to invest in yourself and do that course.  Who know’s a career change might be just what you need!

And if you’d really like to still blow just a little of it – set a limit – maybe 10 – 20% and knock yourself out.  Have that splurge, but be smart too.

Do something that your future self with thank you for.