Tag Archives: savings

Four ways to teach kids healthy money habits

DO as I say, not as i DO!

Set a good example for your little ones, with just a few simple changes.

As a parent, I’m sure you try to ensure your children have the skills to make smart financial decisions.  You know, the things you wish your parents had told you about.  Maybe you’ll tell them about the importance of savings or the power of compounding interest! But did you know that you could be sending them negative money messages without even meaning to?

Here are four common ways you could teach your children healthy money habits.

1.     Reveal the magic behind digital money

Your children have likely seen you pay for hundreds of transactions without glimpsing cash changing hands. For smaller children, it can seem like money problems are solved with magic – just tap a plastic card and the goods are yours! This makes it vitally important to discuss the value of money with them. A good way to start is to explain how your earnings get deposited into your bank account and how you use this account to pay bills. For older children, consider showing them how taxes are deducted from your salary.  Helping them understand how long you need to work to cover the groceries could be of interest.  If you’re on $30 per hour, it could take 7 hours to feed your family.  That nearly a full day, just for food!

2.     Spend wisely

Frequently buying things on an impulse could send the message that it’s fine to spend without planning. Sticking to a budget is key to avoiding impulse-buying.

To set an effective budget, consider working with a professional financial adviser or even investing in an App. Your adviser may help develop a budget that factors in your income, expenses and financial obligations.  Staying on top of it daily with some assistance from your App can help keep you on track to train the kids and kick some goals.

3.     Teach them independence

It’s convenient in those early years to do everything for your children. Seriously, it’ll take much less time, but by giving them a chance to have their own money and decide how and where to spend it, they could learn powerful lessons about budgeting.

For older, even adult children, always offering them financial help can create a cycle of dependency. Letting the wee dears make their own money decisions could just help them develop financial responsibility and realise that the Bank of Mum or Dad isn’t always going to be open for business.

4.     Include them in budgeting

Many parents keep household financial planning and budgeting to themselves, if they even do it.  While you don’t have to fully involve your children in managing all your family’s finances, giving them a role to play, such as getting them to do grocery shopping using a set budget, can teach them lessons about money.

If your children are old enough to earn some income or pocket money, why not get them to pitch in to help achieve a family goal or save for their own spending money for the next holidays.

Use your influence positively

You can strongly influence your children in relation to money, so it’s important to pass on smart money management skills.

If you don’t know where to start, consider reaching out to this  financial adviser to help you stay on top of your finances through proper planning and budgeting.  I may even have some tools to share, so feel free to ask!

Your Super is too Important to Ignore

Superannuation is the one thing you could do for your financial future this year, that could make a big difference to your retirement income. But how much do you really need?

That’s the million dollar, half a million dollar…? question.

Everyone’s needs are different.  Unexpected expenses just crop up, life gets busy and none of us have any clue how long we will actually be in retirement.

Of course, we’d like to think that the safety net of the age pension will still be around in years to come, but just how generous the country can afford to be with this payment, and who will be eligible, is also unknown as this may change year to year.  Sadly, none of us have a crystal ball, and we know it isn’t a lot!

So what exactly are some of the big expenses in retirement we need to budget for?

  • Healthcare
  • Aged Care
  • Food and Beverages
  • Utilities
  • Travel
  • Entertainment
  • Planned or unplanned expenses, i.e. a new car or home renovations

What major impacts could affect our superannuation?

  • How long you live
  • Your health
  • The rate of inflation
  • How much you earn on investments
  • Whether or not you have dependents – yes some retirees still have dependents!

It is wise to have a plan when it comes to your retirement income and a professional financial adviser can help you get a plan in place that is easy for you to manage now, and meets the needs of your ideal retirement.

If you want to start to get your super sorted this year, give me a call on 07 5593 0855.

5 Tips to manage with a Large Family

Take the pain out of managing your family’s finances.

Large families these days are often the exception rather than the rule.  But having said that, I do have a few friends who have decided that their families weren’t complete without four or more!

Taking care of household finances can be taxing for any family, but especially so if you have a large brood. With proper planning and budgeting tho, there’s no need to stress!

Here are some tips to help you effectively manage your family finances.

1.      Give them the once over

Sitting down as parents first and figuring out how much money is coming in and going out may help you gauge the state of your family’s finances. A clear picture of your household income and expenses could set you up to manage your cash flow better.  It’s vital to know your numbers and figuring out what your minimum cost to live is, is vital!

Then, depending on the age of your kids, include them in a family discussion about what it takes to make ends meet.  This doesn’t mean you need to burden them with your ‘we’re broke stories’ but can be great training in their financial literacy journey about what’s involved in running a household.

2.      Rein in the spending

Keeping expenses under control can be rather tough in a large household. But if you’re spending as much or more than you’re earning, you might want to consider limiting your family’s discretionary costs by buying only what you can afford.  This might mean curbing some extra-curricular activities or eating out.

Ask the kids for suggestions on what they’d like to do in place of other paid activities.  Maybe games days, puzzles, hiking, riding or picnics can substitute for movies and theme parks.  They might even surprise you with their ideas!

3.      Set financial goals

Setting financial goals as a family may help you work towards future aspirations instead of simply meeting current expenses. Whether it’s buying a bigger house or going on a dream holiday, having a financial goal may help your family set priorities and stay on track financially.  It also provides a common goal for everyone to work towards.

4.      Keep a budget

Keeping track of spending may help you to better manage your family’s finances. By working with a professional financial adviser, you could create a budget that factors in not only income and expenses, but also your financial obligations.  Some advisers may recommend an App that you can keep handy on your phone to track things daily if needed!

5.      Build up emergency and retirement funds

Unplanned expenses such as medical bills and replacing that poor burnt out washing machine, can put a dent in family finances. But, by growing your emergency fund to cover six months’ worth of expenses, you may be better positioned to handle unexpected events.

While it’s easy to neglect your own financial future when providing for your family, saving for retirement should not take second place. Keep in mind that the earlier you start saving, the better chance you have to grow a sufficient nest egg.

Working with an adviser

Managing finances for a big family need not be a painful exercise. By working alongside a financial adviser to keep track of your spending, and discussing money matters and setting financial goals as a family, handling household finances is a task you can achieve.

Five financial moves to make in your 40’s

In your 40’s? Here’s 5 moves to make so you can get financially ahead.

Being in your 40’s can involve balancing many different responsibilities and it becomes easy to neglect your own financial well-being. But it’s not too late to secure your future. Here are 5 tips that may help you financially make the most of your 40’s.

1.      Create a plan

If you don’t have a financial plan, then it’s totally time to get one. Ensure that it’s based on your needs and priorities. By working with a professional adviser, you may be able to tailor a plan that can help you maximise your ability to save and invest.

2.      Grow savings

Your 40’s could be your peak earning years, so it may be a good idea to ramp up your savings and funnel some of your income into superannuation or investment accounts. Be sure to do your homework and consult with a professional financial adviser about your options and reducing debt.

3.      Check your superannuation

A quick super health check may help you optimise your retirement savings. For example, by choosing a different investment option or type of risk, you may be able to earn better returns on your super. If you have a few funds, consolidating your accounts may help save on fees. Again, seek advice from a professional adviser before acting as you may leave yourself open to losing some important benefits.

4.      Avoid lifestyle creep

People usually have a tendency to inflate their standard of living as they earn more and can then afford more things, such as a better car or house. While it’s natural to want the finer things in life, you’ll likely end up with little to no financial gain if your spending rises as quickly or more quickly, than your income. Try stick to your long-term financial goals and remember the big picture.  You lived on your income until you got the pay rise or bonus, so chances are, you still can, and stash the difference.

5.      Invest more

Your 40’s may be a good time to invest more – or diversify your investments – to help you grow your long-term savings.  Keep in mind that it’s important to choose instruments that suit your risk appetite and time horizon. Developing a strategy with your financial adviser might make it easier achieve the return required to reach your financial goals.

Tips to manage your money when in a relationship

It may sound bleedingly obvious, but couples can reach their shared goals by keeping their finances healthy.

Whether saving for a house or holiday or seeking to grow or preserve wealth, couples can reach their common goals by managing money well. Here are some practical tips for managing your finances together.

Talk about it, talk about it, talk about it, yeh…

At the risk of sounding like a lyric, it’s important for couples to talk to each other about their finances and how to manage them, to avoid any potential conflict. Discuss your financial situation and goals, and any concerns you may have.  Chances are, you may have grown up with wildly different parenting styles when it comes to money, and your personal ideas about money are brought to the joint kitchen table. The American Psychological Association also suggests talking about your beliefs about money to help you better understand each other and set the stage for healthy conversations.[1]  You may hold the ideas your parents instilled, or have vastly different beliefs about money.

Set goals

Couples often have wide ranging and different priorities, but this doesn’t mean you can’t set common financial goals and work together to save for them. Keeping an open line of communication about your aspirations may help you adjust personal priorities to achieve shared goals.  Everything from big ticket household items, new cars, holidays and babies can be covered here.

Divvy up responsibilities

Sharing responsibilities for paying joint expenses and building savings may help ensure you and your partner are on the same page when it comes to finances. You can opt to split those responsibilities equally or put the main breadwinner in charge of most of them. Whatever you choose, it’s important both are happy with the decision.  Some enjoy maintaining their own personal accounts and contribute a set amount to a ‘family account’ to cover all joint expenses and debts.

Create a budget

A budget usually tracks your spending on a weekly or monthly basis, but often the very mention of the word can make eyes glaze over and you suddenly find that doing the ironing is actually more interesting. So, if a budget isn’t your thing, simply agree on how you will spend – and save – your money.

Build your funds

If you are married or in a de facto relationship, you may want to consider helping each other build retirement funds. You might explore contributing to your partner’s superannuation account if your partner is not working or earns a low income.

Before you make such an arrangement, it is wise to get professional advice on how it works. Your financial adviser may talk you through the rules of spouse contributions and the requirements to become eligible for a tax offset.

Bet we can help with some other stuff too!

 

[1] The American Psychological Association, ‘Happy couples: How to avoid money arguments’. Available at http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/money-conflict.aspx.

Retirement Goals!

For some, retirement is a long way off!  For others, it seems to be creeping up a lot more quickly than expected.  The years have flown by and it’s time to start taking stock.

Many who visit me in their late 40’s to mid 50’s sometimes realise that they’ve put retirement on the back burner for a little too long.  With taking care of the Mortgage and the kids… retirement saving was a long way down the list!

But for those ready to hang up the boots, whether at 65, 70 or beyond… what can you expect?

Many advise that a new kind of balance is required, one that takes a bit more planning than expected.

It’s good to start thinking about your vision for your retired life and the values you have that may drive those goals.  Have you been planning travel? volunteering? hanging out with the grand kids? visiting more with elderly parents? taking up a hobby?

Strange tho it may seem, retirement and pure leisure hours only, can impact your health.  Everything you’ve ever known has suddenly stopped.  Routine, income and your network is no more which can have a big impact on mental health especially.  Choosing to be optimistic about your future options is incredibly important.

Family relationships can also come under scrutiny.  Suddenly spending 24/7 with your life partner may not be what either of you expect.  Learning how to communicate what both of you need, while maintaining some sense of independence is vital!

Are you looking to replace the hours you spent working with something else?  Some enjoy volunteering, others enjoy researching the family history or writing that book that you always put off, even learning a new skill or going back to school can be considered.  Travel plans also need consideration – those who’ve traveled extensively during their work life may not wish to venture so far from home, others can’t wait to become intrepid explorers!

Often, what to do with the family home also needs consideration.  Some empty-nesters love keeping their family home and it’s memories, others like to move on and downsize for less maintenance and possibly availing themselves of additional funds.  Moving interstate to be near the family or a group of friends also needs consideration but taking on too many things at once can be a little overwhelming… it’s good to learn to pace yourself.

Managing the finances also requires careful consideration.  Some find that their immediate spend in the first few years following retirement is much higher than they’d previously thought it might be.  Funding travel or new gadgets may be fun, but if they haven’t been budgeted for, can impact the long term value of savings.  Longevity risk is gaining a lot of exposure now, with many living well into their 90’s and hoping they don’t outlive their savings.

Who knew that ‘hanging up the boots’ could be so complicated?

It’s a great idea to sit down with your adviser and talk through your options.  What works for one, won’t work for all, so setting and achieving what’s important to you is vital.

Saving for retirement: Hacks for parents with dependents

You can build your retirement savings while supporting your dependants.

Providing for the kids doesn’t have to come at the expense of stashing funds for retirement. There are ways you can build a sufficient nest egg while supporting your children.  And chances are, you’ll be spending a lot longer in retirement than previous generations… who knew?

Saving for retirement

Forced saving can be your best ally in building your retirement fund. Making voluntary contributions to your super through salary sacrifice can seriously boost your nest egg.  You can make concessional super contributions of up to $25,000 each financial year (which includes your employer’s super guarantee contributions.) The government will tax your salary-sacrificed contributions at 15% which may be much lower than your marginal tax rate.

It may also be worth looking at how and where your super fund invests your money. Choosing a different investment option may help you earn better returns and grow your super.  Do you know what your Investor Risk Profile is?  Conservative?  Balanced?  Aggressive?

Super can be a difficult subject to get your head around. Have a chat with your adviser about how you can boost your super by making voluntary contributions or changing your investment options. Your adviser can also knows about retirement saving options beyond super.

Protecting your income

While you’re building your fund for retirement and still supporting those eating you out of house and home, it’s important to protect your current income in case you’re unable to work due to an illness or injury. Taking out income protection insurance is an incredibly wise precaution against any event that can prevent you from working. This policy may provide a monthly income to support you and your family during your recovery and help you stay on track with your financial commitments.  Premiums are tax deductible.  And if you think about it, why wouldn’t you insure your most important asset? – the ability to earn an income!

It’s also crucial to ensure your dependants are looked after if you die or became seriously ill or disabled. Having life insurance, total and permanent disability cover, and trauma insurance can help you protect what’s important to you.

Get advice

Balancing your need to prepare for retirement and your responsibility to your partner and kids can be tough, but keep in mind that help is always available. Speak to your adviser about how you can provide for your dependants while building a nest egg for a comfortable retirement.

Your future self will thank you for it!