Tag Archives: philanthropy

Collaborating on an orphanage wall

So our day started bright and early with a 4.30 wake up and a flight from Bangkok to Ubonrachatani in the north.

Our group had been looking forward to heading to the Home Hug orphanage as the highlight of the visit.

For most who’d visited before, it was to rekindle relationships with the children and the beautiful Mae Thiew who has been looking after children for 40 years in her local community.

Many years ago, Mae Thiew was moved by the conditions of those in the hill tribes and seeing families sell their children to traffickers for money.

She sold everything and moved to the north, buying land and fiercely protecting the children who came into her care.

Times weren’t always easy and some days she needed to decide whether children needed medicine or food. Awful choices to have to make with many children dying.

Since Hands Across the Water partnered with the orphanage, no children have died.

And so we met the gorgeous children who live under the loving care and protection of Mae Thiew.

Our role at the orphanage was to paint the new wall out the front of Home hug to make it into a welcoming place, help remove the stigma associated with the children, some of whom have HIV and be a highlight for those coming to visit.

We were shown a great video of the amazing ability of art to bring together a community – watch the Ted Talk here.

We then collaborated, came up with different plans and the children chose their favourite, incorporating many ideas into what they’d like.

We eventually settled on a child weilding a ribbon to mirror the saffron colours of Mae Thiew’s robe, green for grass underneath with white handprints of those who’ve visited and blue sky above full of music, love and the bikes for the fantastic riders who every year raise so much for the work Hands do.

We learnt beautiful lessons on resilience and determination from this quiet and steel willed monk.

We drank in the smiles and relished holding hands and exploring the property with the children who taught us that acceptance, tolerance and happiness were still options despite adversity.

An amazing and moving day once again on  day 2 of our Social Venture Program…

 

“Slumming it” for a day…

It’s incredible to me how everyday cliché expressions, can take on new meanings after certain activities.

On returning from Africa last year, each time someone jokingly asked ‘I wonder what the poor people are doing?’… I knew.

And now I know what it means to truly ‘slum it.’

Our mission in the Khlong Toei slums of Bangkok, was to destroy a family home so that a new, better, more inhabitable dwelling could be built on site for a family.

We met lovely On and her son Anon who lived in the ‘home’ and I use the term loosely, it would have been condemned years ago where I come from.

The lower floor was covered in a foot of stagnant swamp water and rubbish and had been abandoned for years.  The only way to the upper lever was through a set of stairs unlike any I’ve ever had to navigate before.

On top of this, On had polio as a child and still carries a decided limp.  Her son, Anon is suffering from leukemia and is currently undergoing treatment.  Yet on each of his returns from hospital, he heads back to this home.

The family mattress was full of holes and cockroaches.  There’s no running water, sewage facilities or cooking abilities at the home.  It really wasn’t much more than a ‘roof over their head.’  The floor boards were rotten and termite eaten and full of holes.

And so we tore it down.

On and Anon are in temporary accommodation for the next six weeks whilst locals come in to build a new, entirely habitable dwelling for the family.  Raised enough so the swelling of the Chao Praya river doesn’t leave part of itself behind each time it floods.

It is this that the funds raised by the 13 people sharing this journey with me go towards.  The Duang Prateep Foundation in partnership with Hands Across the Water ensure that On has all she needs going forward.  The funds we raised cover new mattresses, cooking utensils, pots and the furniture we helped put together.

It was an epic day.  Busy, fruitful, emotional and in turn made us so grateful.  We had highs and lows, but were so proud that we were a part of this great opportunity to afford someone a better life and grateful too for our own families and the homes we get to return to.

Next stop, the orphanages of Yasoton…