Tag Archives: fundraising

Are you an Amazing Unleashed Woman?

I’m so excited!  I’ve just found out that I’ve been approved for a grant from the Million Dollar Round Table in the United States for UDS$1,000 to support my work with The Hunger Project.  Woohoo!

After my visits to Uganda and Malawi, I’ve become even more passionate about the empowerment of women in global communities and the drive to end hunger.  It frustrates me that so many of us have so much, while so many struggle with so little.

Did you Know?  A donation of even $50 can help give 3 women a micro-finance loan to start or grow a small business to create further income for their families.  We drop that no problem on a meal out or a few drinks with friends.

And here’s an example of what a couple of weeks groceries,  just $500 is able to achieve:

  • Train 400 mothers on feeding their children locally available nutritious food, so their children grow up healthy; or
  • Give 30 women a start-up micro-finance loan to start or grow a small business, to create income for her family; or
  • Empower 15 women to become local volunteer leaders and train their fellow villagers on issues such as education and sanitation.

But, if you’d rather spend your hard-earned dosh on a table at a fabulous restaurant spoiling your loved one on Valentine’s Day, I completely get that too.  So why not bid on A Table to End Hunger and empower others to put food on theirs.   Get in quick!

I’ve been so amazed by the incredible people who’ve supported my journey to date and those who’ve jumped on board and joined the movement.

I’d love to welcome you to become Unleashed with me again for the coming year!

And it’s still not too late to donate – if you’d like to help others to help themselves, please donate here: Unleashed Amanda’s Fundraising Page

A visit to Champiti

Our travels today took us to an Epicentre of The Hunger Project (THP) called Champiti, which has been awarded the status of self-reliance, a huge effort by the local community!

Our bus trip took a couple of hours to head North-West of Blantyre and we passed much barren territory, a lasting effect of the past three years of El Nino which has devastated the country.

Our first stop was the home and shop of the inspirational Sarah Dzenza and the local women greeted us with song, dance and some serious ululating (which we later practiced in the bus!)  Sarah embraced the philosophy of The Hunger Project early and has had 6 loans from the rural bank to expand and grow her businesses (selling supplies and sarongs) and improve her home, now a burnt brick dwelling with rendered walls and an iron roof – quite an achievement!

It was a little overwhelming for me to walk up to her home with memories flooding back of my previous visit to Uganda, being surrounded by children whose folks are doing everything they can to give them a better life, the incredible heat and noise and sunlight that is Africa.

We then headed to briefly meet the first chairman of the Epicentre, Mr Hiwa and his lovely wife of 50 years who explained what life was like for the villages prior to THP and how their lives and that of the community has improved.  Next stop the Epicentre!!

Another amazing traditional dance from both the men and women greeted us on arrival and it felt like we were walking into a National Geographic spread.  We were proudly shown around the maize mill, food bank, medical facilities and rural bank with the local team on hand to answer questions about how they’d managed to achieve the status of self-reliance.

A deeper dive into the various works that committees arrange, such as Women’s Empowerment, Nutrition, Health, HIV & AIDS, Water & Sanitation, Food Security, Micro-finance, Education and Literacy were all covered.  No handouts here, just education across all that’s necessary and massive mindset changes required to move past the resignation and into a place of hope.

Spending time with Everton, the young bank manager and learning about his family and job was lovely.  He tells me women are educated before taking out the loans and strict warnings are given not to pass on the funds to their husbands as they are still responsible for the loan and any associated interest (around 2%) even if their husband’s spend the money!  A warning that women the world over would be wise to follow!

Sex Ed was also fascinating with the mindset changes required for communities to embrace male and female condoms and HIV testing and increasing health and sanitation practices.

After hours of learning and inspiration from the local Malawians we were all invited to join in final songs and dance.  We all need so much more spontaneous song and dance in our lives!  An uplifting and beautiful way to finish our visit.  Then time for selfies, hugs, goodbyes with the kids, more pictures and long waves…

On the way home, a brilliant sunset occurred to our west, as the supermoon rose from the east in epic African skies.  A fitting end to a fabulous day of learning and laughter.

 

I won a trip to the Bangkok Slums!

Well, there’s a blog title I never thought I’d write… or even be a little excited about, but as it turns out, in 9 more sleeps, I’m off to Thailand.

And as much I’d love to be sipping Mai Tai’s by the pool at a stunning resort… that’s NOT what this trip is all about.

I recently attended the Future of Leadership forum in Brisbane which has a fabulous number of brilliant speakers donating their time and resources to raise funds for the amazing charity, Hands Across the Water (aka Hands or HATW.)

One of the prizes on the day, which I was fortunate enough to take out, was a trip for the Hands “Social Venture Program.”  This 6 day program will take me from the Khlong Toei Slums in Bangkok to the community Projects and orphanages in Yasothon, Northern Thailand.

The people I’ll be meeting aren’t famous for the attention they garner, they aren’t social media stars and they don’t drop quotable quips, but they are possibly the most amazing people for the impact they have on their local communities and the lives they live.

It will be my privilege to spend time in their homes, learning and changing myself.  I feel so blessed to lead the life that I do, and cherish the moments where I can learn and grow as a human from these remarkable people who do so much, not because they want to be famous, but because they can.

We’ll be relocating a very deserving family from the slums into temporary accommodation, then demolishing their home for locals to be able to come in and build a new, habitable dwelling for the family.

Then we’re off to Northern Thailand to work with the Home Hug orphanage, be involved in the community project in Surin and make a difference however we can before returning to Bangkok.

So far, I’ve been able to raise $2,000 for this fantastic cause and I’d love if you’d like to contribute too: Donate Here

If you’d like to know more about the amazing work that Hands does in their Social Venture Program, or have your corporate or colleagues involved, you can check them out here: HATW Social Venture Program

I look forward to sharing my adventures as I go and will keep you posted on this amazing trip.

Why The Hunger Project Resonated with Me

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Charity is often a deeply personal issue and only becomes dear to us when we are personally affected or emotionally moved by an issue.

I was a giver, over a long period of time – little bits, to a lot of places.  I love the Guide Dogs, Fred Hollows Foundation and the RACQ Care Flight Chopper – they’re all personal favourites.

But choosing to partner with The Hunger Project and commit to raising over $10,000 was the first time I’d ever embarked on anything of this size or nature.

Here’s a few reasons why The Hunger Project got my vote and why I’ll be heading to Ethiopia next May:

The Three Fundamental Pillars of The Hunger Project.

Top-down, aid-driven charity models often fail to reach the people who need the most help. To be sustainable, we have discovered three critical elements that, when combined, empower people to make rapid progress in overcoming hunger and poverty:

  1. Mobilisation for self-reliance
  2. Empowering women as key change-agents for development
  3. Making local government work
  4. Mobilisation for self-reliance

The Challenges:
A. People in under-developed countries, particularly in rural areas, often live or work in isolation. Whether this is because they are physically isolated such as in the jungles of Africa, or socially isolated by caste or because they are women who are not allowed to leave their homes without a male escort, or villages that are divided by tribal rivalries, any kind of division weakens their potential collective power.

  1. Often aid money has come and gone, but the people are still hungry, and they come to believe that it will always be this way. This can lead to hopelessness and cynicism.

Our Work: When people are united for a purpose and act together to improve their own conditions, there is a multiplier effect and much more can be accomplished.

One of our first steps is to reduce the resignation that chronic hunger and poverty creates in a community.  We work to bring people together to unleash their creativity and productivity through education and skill building. Through a process of enquiry, we ask the villagers what is missing then help develop a social structure that allows local, productive action, self-confidence and strong advocacy in each region.  395,000 trained volunteers around the world are mobilising millions of others to take self-reliant actions.

In Africa, through our Epicentre Strategy, more than 121 clusters of villages have launched village-level projects to generate their own income and build classrooms, food storage facilities and health clinics.

In India more than 83,000 elected women representatives in India are speaking out and bringing water, health and education to their villages.

In Bangladesh 272,000 trained Animators and volunteer youth leaders are initiating projects such as campaigns against early marriage, dowry and violence against women; education programs for safe drinking water, nutrition and sanitation; birth registration for rural communities; and income-generating activities.

  1. Empowering women as key change-agents for development.

The Challenges: In most of the areas where we work there is severe gender discrimination which perpetuates a cycle of poverty and malnutrition.

Our Work: Studies show that women are the best change agents. We work with grassroots women to help them gain a voice in local decision-making, shifting local priorities towards nutrition, sanitation, clean water, health and education. We coalesce women who work together to end corruption, stop early child-marriage, and ensure punishment for rape and domestic violence. Our model emphasises important roles for women, working as equals to men, to determine community priorities and build the required skills to transform their lives for generations to come.  Many studies have proven that when women are supported and empowered, all of society benefits. Their families are healthier, more children go to school, agricultural productivity improves and incomes increase.

In Africa, Our Microfinance Programs provide women food farmers easy access to credit, adequate training regarding the importance of saving and income generation.

1.3 million people have taken the HIV/AIDS and Gender Inequality Workshop.

In India, our Women’s Leadership Workshop has empowered over 83,000 women elected to local councils to be effective change agents in their villages.

In Bangladesh, we catalysed the formation of a 300-organisation alliance that organises more than 800 events across the country each September in honour of National Girl Child Day, a day to focus on eradicating all forms of discrimination against girls.

  1. Making local government work.

The Challenges: Weak, corrupt, or unresponsive local government. Need we say more?

Our Work: In working with the local people we find and train leaders who learn to reform laws by transforming the mindsets of local officials. They focus on the issues of primary education and health care, family income, nutrition, water and sanitation. These can only be solved at the local level, and will only be solved when people are able to communicate their needs to leaders and hold them to account.

In Africa, Local government officials are included at every stage of our Epicentre Strategy. When the villagers build the epicentre building, local government provides nurses, teachers and supplies for the preschool and health clinic. Some African governments, having seen our success, are building The Hunger Project model into their national plans.

In India, we work in 3418 local village-level government units (gram panchayats), in 90 districts. There are 175 block-level Federations in 8 States where locally elected rural women come together to voice concerns and change laws as a collective unit. Currently, the priority issues include increased transparency at all levels of government. We also partner with 48 local organisations to jointly accomplish improved education, nutrition and health.

In Bangladesh, we work with 508 local government bodies (Union Parishads) ensuring 100 percent sanitary latrine coverage, 100 percent birth and death registration, and open budget meetings to provide transparency and accountability.

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If any of this also strikes a chord with you and you’d like to donate to this great cause, please support my efforts at: http://tinyurl.com/pd5c8y6

THP

The Hunger Games for The Hunger Project

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Well, I’m about to kick off my fundraising efforts for my adventures with The Hunger Project, with a movie night!  The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 seems to be a good place to start!

I’m hoping to get at least 100 along to a private screening of the movie at Event Cinemas, Robina Town Centre on Saturday, December 6 at 6 pm to hear a little more on The Hunger Project and how it works and to raise funds for this great cause.

If you’re able to join us, please grab your tickets here:

http://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-hunger-games-for-the-hunger-project-tickets-14334638289?aff=efbevent

If you can’t make it along and would love the support my efforts, all donations are graciously accepted here:

https://thp.secure.force.com/Donations/CICD__Fundraise?id=70190000000WL9z

Next year, I’m hosting a Ball at Bond University in March and will be hosting some Ethiopian dancers, hopefully showcasing some jewellery from Ethiopian women, holding a silent auction and having a great dance with a band.  Stick around on the blog to find out more about that too!

I hope you can join me on this journey, culminating in a visit to Ethiopia in May, 2015 to see the grassroots work that The Hunger Project does to make a difference in people’s lives.

My Journey with The Hunger Project

A big thrill for me over the coming months is to share my journey with The Hunger Project, in partnership with Business Chicks, culminating in a trip to Ethiopia next May.

I’ve committed to raising $25,000 for this very worthy cause, and just having heard first-hand how well the system works, based on Navali’s story from Rajasthan, am really looking forward to this.

To hear how a 20 year old girl from a rural village was educated and became an elected official in her village and has made such a difference to her community, establishing schools, stopping the abduction of a 14 year old girl in her village and even the wedding of another child in a different area is testament to how THP works at such a grass roots level.  There’s no stopping this girl and her dreams are only just starting to become a reality.

Navali

So, a little on who and what The Hunger Project is all about.

Their Vision is to ensure a world where every woman, man and child lives a healthy, fulfilling life of self-reliance and dignity.  Sounds fair to me.

Their Vision is simply to end hunger and poverty by pioneering sustainable, grassroots, women centred strategies and advocating for their widespread adoption in countries throughout the world.

Cathy BurkeCathy Burke, Australia CEO sharing the vision

To date, THP has reached 24 million people in Africa, India, Bangladesh and Latin America across 15,000 villages.

There’s now over 395,000 locally trained volunteers leading change in their communities.  Ten partner countries are leading the change to empower 12 countries involved in the programmes.

The three pillars are to:

  1. Start with Women: Studies show that when women are supported and empowered, all of society benefits. This is why we focus on building the capacity of women.
  2. Mobilise everyone: They build people’s knowledge, skills and leadership, so they can take action to improve their own communities; and
  3. Engage Government: by empowering people to communicate their needs to local government to ensure they are effective and accountable.

Living in a country like Australia where our lifestyles are so generous and free means we often don’t give a thought to those less fortunate than ourselves.  And if we do, the confront can make us squirm, and be a little hard to deal with. Time for me to meet that head-on and try and make my little difference.

Please, if you can join me on this journey and give something to ‘give back’ any donation would be gratefully and graciously accepted.  Please go to my page for your pledge here:  Amanda’s THP Ethiopian Adventure

Poverty can drain human dignity, and financial aid without collaboration can actually make systemic hunger worse.  Who knew?? Through their integrated and wholistic approach, THP assists people, believing they can end their own hunger.

Thank you in advance for any support provided which assists women, children and entire villages to become self-reliant, eliminating hunger and poverty.  Donations of $2 or more are tax deductible.

Former THP Trippers:  Trippers