Tag Archives: financial advice

Are you a Key Person?

Key-person insurance is Protection for your business

How would your organisation cope if something happened to a key person?

Unexpected events can play havoc not only with people’s lives but also with businesses.

However, business owners are often so busy they don’t stop to consider the true cost of the loss of a key employee, business partner or even themselves.  Eeeek!

The knock-on effects may include disruption to other staff, missed opportunities, delays or penalties for late delivery of projects, lost revenue, increased expenses, significant costs to find and train a suitable replacement, loan repayment and even loss of the business.  Ouch!

What is key-person insurance?

Key-person insurance protects a business’s financial position against the significant impact of a traumatic event such as the death or disablement of a key person.

A key person may be an employee, owner or an individual whose contribution to the business is significant.

This cover is not a specific kind of insurance but the application of life insurance to protect against key-person risk. It can be used with buy/sell life insurance (also known as business succession insurance) which covers the change of ownership if an owner dies or becomes incapacitated.

The benefits

Often a cash injection to an affected business may keep a bad situation from becoming worse or even catastrophic. The insurance proceeds may be used to:

  • minimise or eliminate the potential loss of revenue, sales or profits
  • help cover the often significant costs of finding or training a replacement
  • service or repay any debts that are called in
  • cover the impact of a writedown in the goodwill of the business
  • provide needed liquidity
  • help keep staff and maintain essential supplier relationships.

Are there alternatives?

A business may have other strategies to help manage their risks, including asset sales, promoting staff or reallocating workloads even temporarily, using profits, borrowing more, or drawing down existing loan facilities.

However, insurance is the only practical alternative where a business doesn’t have the capacity to cover its risks.

If you want to know more and see if it can apply to your business, why not give me a call? 07 5593 0855.

Create a great financial new year

New Year’s resolutions are easy to make but often hard to keep. But there are real benefits to making financial resolutions. Here are some helpful suggestions to get you started.

Chances are by now, you’ve forgotten what you wanted to achieve last New Year’s Eve, but a new financial year is also a great time to reset.

Get back to basics

If you find it near-impossible to reach your financial goals, you may need to revisit the basics: sticking to a budget. Does temptation usually unravel all your good saving intentions? Consider opening a locked savings account that you can’t deduct money from for a period of time, and automatically transfer funds into it each payday.  Automating everything in your life that can be is truly a gift!

Plan for large purchases

Whether you need a new fridge or are considering placing a deposit on a home, the earlier you start planning for these purchases, the more manageable they become.

If you know you’ll need a new item in 6 months that costs $1,000,  that means you need to set aside around $40 per week to make it happen… that’s a few sneaky coffees that may need to go!

Set up an investment plan

If you’re considering investing this year (instead of someday,) developing a sound investment plan is essential for your success. This may include working with your financial adviser to identify clear financial targets, calculate how much you can afford to invest and determine how much risk you’re willing to take on. 

If you’d like to have a small nest egg before you sit down with someone, again, automate the process so every week you’re setting aside an amount to put towards that portfolio.  Everyone started somewhere!

Review insurance policies

Knowing you are properly insured provides peace of mind if your circumstances change unexpectedly. But identifying appropriate insurance policies and levels of coverage for your unique situation can be difficult – and getting it wrong is risky… as you’ll likely find at claim time. This is why it’s important to regularly review your insurance policies with your financial adviser, especially if your situation changes.

You may be able to find that funding via various structures frees up cash flow to invest in personal insurances you may not have otherwise been able to afford.  Good advice is worth every cent!

Check your super

If you have multiple superannuation accounts – or have forgotten where your super is – you’re not alone. According to the Australian Taxation Office, there’s $18 billion of lost super waiting to be claimed nationally.1

Effectively managing your super is vital for building your retirement nest egg. Contact your financial adviser who may help you manage your super.  It’s also worth seeing what insurances are covered in your fund so you aren’t paying extra for cover you don’t need.

Set retirement goals

The earlier you set clear goals for your retirement, the more options you’ll have. Work out what assets you have – from your home to superannuation – and review your current spending patterns, then determine your goals for retirement and what lifestyle you’d like to enjoy. This will help you calculate how much you’ll need.

Remember, we’re now living a lot longer, which means our money may now need to last 30 years in retirement, or we may choose to work longer.  Our health is also an issue that needs consideration as we age and this too will impact our retirement years.

Create an estate plan

Estate planning involves more than writing a will. It outlines what you want done with your documents, contacts, debts, bills and assets, making the process easier for your beneficiaries after you’ve passed away.

Whatever your financial New Financial Years’ resolution may be, seeking professional advice may help you make it reality this year.

 

Note:
1 The Sydney Morning Herald, 2017, ‘Almost $18b in lost super waiting to be claimed’. Accessible at:

http://www.smh.com.au/money/super-and-funds/tax-office-holds-records-of-almost-18-billion-in-lost-super-20170920-gylo3z.html

A money-wise wedding

Creating a budget for the big day

Whether you’re planning a large, luxurious, lavish and luscious wedding or a small, intimate affair, smart budgeting could help free you from financial worries, so you can enjoy your special day even more.

Following these steps may help ensure no one’s worried about debt on the honeymoon.  And remember, even if you only plan on doing the walk down the aisle once, it’s just a day… and the rest of your life is what it’s all about.

Starting with massive debt and stress about money is a less than ideal way to continue your life together.

1. Plan early

Given that the average (is there such a thing?) Australian wedding costs $36,200[1], the sooner you start saving, the sooner your dream wedding can become a reality.  (I hope your parents are all over this stat!)

The day after the engagement is fine… tho some do start even before that… like while you’re watching the latest episode of Batchelor in Paradise and dreaming about finding Mr or Mrs Right.

2. Create a budget

Take stock of your income and calculate the maximum you can afford to spend on the wedding – and your ideal cost scenario. Will your parents be pitching in and what can you expect from them?

Knowing what you can spend in each area means that you’re all over it when negotiating with suppliers.  If you don’t have room to move, you can play hard-ball or find someone else who is willing to come to the party.

No-one will remember if you had the world’s largest bouquet or the best tablecloths or the food you serve (unless the oysters are dodgy,) it’s all about celebrating your love and new life.

3. Talk to your family

If you’re part of the bride’s or groom’s family and want to contribute, let them know. You could contribute a set figure or fund a specific part of the ceremony, such as the flowers, drinks (very brave move!) or venue.

If you’ve got friends in the right places, make sure you include them in your planning.  Chances are, they may also know some others who are happy to help.

4. Prioritise

What must you have at the wedding and what can you compromise on? For example, do you want a live band but aren’t fussed about fancy table decorations?  Do you want the Disney fairytale carriage experience, or your mate’s EH Holden will do the trick?  Agreeing on your priorities up front can help you clarify which aspects to save for and which to downplay or skip altogether.

Do you want the amazing Vera Wang frock that you can rock on the day and hang in the cupboard for the rest of your life and drag from home to home; or would you rather spend it on the honeymoon or save for a housing deposit?  Life’s full of compromises!

5. Start a spreadsheet… if you must!

Once you have an idea of your budget and priorities, it’s time to dive into the details.  OK, not everyone loves this part, but it is really necessary!

If you’re an excel nerd, use a spreadsheet to list a maximum cost for every wedding-related item from bouquet to band and compare it with vendors’ quotes. Don’t forget to take into account hidden costs like insurance, corkage and the marriage licence or celebrant as well as costs related to the rehearsal dinner and honeymoon.

Otherwise, a wedding planning notebook is fine… as long as you have something to track it all in.

6. Stay accountable

Avoid blowing out your budget by keeping your spreadsheet (or Kikki K notebook) up to date, setting up a wedding-expenses-only bank account, and sticking to your guns as far as your limits and priorities are concerned.

If you’ve created your budget and despair of affording your dream wedding any time soon, don’t worry. Here are some tips to help you reign in your costs.

  • Limit your guest list to your favourite people: At $100 per head, every 10 guests cost you $1,000.
  • Think outside the box when picking a wedding venue: A park, garden, art gallery or friend’s house may be more affordable than a hotel, and the natural ambience can save you money on decorations.
  • Book an out-of-season wedding: It can be cheaper to schedule a wedding in winter, on a week night or a Sunday morning.
  • Keep your menu simple: Stick with the specialties of the season and region, consider canapes or buffets over three-course meals, and ask for house spirits (not top-shelf varieties) or beer and wine.
  • Investigate hiring over buying: If there’s some items you don’t need forever, like suits or gowns it may be worth hiring for the day and giving back.  No dry-cleaning necessary!

Call in an expert

While you may call upon a wedding planner to help you organise your special day, a financial planner may be just as important.

A professional financial adviser may help you create and stick to your budget as well as stay accountable – so you can focus on the important things, like celebrating with the people you love!

If all that just sounds too hard, run off to the Registry office and have a party when you make the announcement!

And hey!  Congratulations!!

 

[1] Australian Securities and Investments Commission, ‘How much can a wedding cost?’. MoneySmart. Available at: https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/managing-your-money/budgeting/simple-ways-to-save-money/how-much-can-a-wedding-cost

Do you have a valid will?

Creating a valid will is one of the most important things you can do to protect your loved ones.

Here we explain how to go about it.

1. Seek legal advice

While DIY will kits can seem like an easy and inexpensive way to make a will, they can be fraught with pitfalls.

Your affairs are probably more complex than you think – your family home, other properties, business assets, superannuation, investments and personal belongings.  You may be surprised to learn that not all assets are covered as standard in a Will and stay outside of your estate.  Having a properly drawn up will helps to determine who gets what and can save your family time and stress when you are gone.  And not all assets are automatically included in your estate and may need separate provision made to ensure their distribution.

Your lawyer or financial planner will also be able to provide insights into how to best structure your will, both to protect assets and to minimise tax. Examples include setting up a testamentary trust to provide for minors or protecting your estate from creditors.

2. Safeguard your children’s future

Probably one of the most important reasons to make a will is to ensure any dependent children are well cared for should the worst happen.

Sydney wills, probate and estate specialist, Graeme Heckenburg of Heckenberg Lawyers, says generally parents should make separate rather than joint wills, as they are likely to die at different times.

Heckenburg says a will should also appoint a guardian to take care of the day to day living and housing arrangements for the children and a trustee to execute the will and make any financial decisions. This can be one person or two different people.

“If you don’t appoint a guardian and there are young children, ultimately the decision will be made by the Guardianship Tribunal [in NSW]. If the guardianship is contested, the matter could even end up in the Supreme Court,” he says.

If you have adult children, you also need to consider their circumstances.  If they’re caught up in a divorce or bankruptcy issues, any inheritance can form part of their assets, which may not be what you wish.

Vulnerable adult children also need to be considered as receiving a large lump sum may not be in their best interests either.

3. Keep your will updated

Once you have made a will, don’t leave it in a drawer gathering dust.

Circumstances change over time, and often quickly, so ensure your will reflects your current situation, particularly if your spouse has died, you have married, re-married or divorced or you have become a parent or step-parent.

We’d love to help or put in touch with our legal experts who can assist with your estate planning.

Six ways to ease your debt burden

Debt is one of the fixtures of modern life for most people but if you feel it’s getting out of your control, it’s time to act.

Fortunately, there are straightforward ways to regain control of your money.

Start a debt management plan

This will mean prioritising your debts in order of urgency, setting a budget, cutting expenses, consolidating, and planning ahead.

1. Set a budget

Work out how much you spend each week on your debts and discretionary spending and how much income you have. It’s vital that you are honest. From this you can work out how much you need to service your debts to bring them down to manageable levels.

2. Save on easy things

The most obvious way to reduce debt is to cut down your spending on non-essential items. Simple ways include doing things yourself that you previously paid others to do, such as cleaning your house. Eat out less. Cook at home and eat your leftovers at work. Don’t buy things you don’t need at the supermarket and turn off lights and computers when they are not in use. Walk more or take public transport.

3. Stop using your credit cards

Pay cash. Put your credit cards away. The simple logic is that you won’t be tempted to overspend if you only have cash.

4. Pay the minimum on each debt

Service each debt, be it phone, mortgage or credit card each month. Pay off as much as you can but at least pay the minimum, which will protect your credit score.

5. Consider a consolidation loan

You may be able to reduce your interest charges by consolidating your debts into one low-interest loan.

6. Talk to a professional

Your Adviser will work with you to develop a debt management plan that’s specifically tailored to you.

But if you are feeling really overwhelmed, seek help from your doctor.

Returning to work? Four things to think about

There are many reasons for taking a break from the workforce: to have a baby, look after family members, or recover from a redundancy or illness. Whatever the reason, returning to work can be challenging. Here are some tips that may help give you the confidence you’re after.

1. How are your finances?

Before starting a new job, or returning to a previous role, take the opportunity to review your financial situation. Are all your bills paid? How good is your debt management? You should also update your budget to account for your new income, keeping in mind any changes in expenses such as child care, and ensuring you have savings in case of emergency. This is also a great time to think about income protection insurance.

2. Check your superannuation

Your superannuation savings may have stalled from lack of employer contributions. If you’d like to try to catch up, there are options. For example, you can salary sacrifice part of your pay or you may be eligible for the government’s co-contribution scheme.

Spouse contributions may also help, and under the superannuation reforms that came into effect on 1 July 2017, anyone with a partner who earns less than $40,000 can contribute to their super and may receive a tax offset in return.

3. Stay in touch

While you’re still on leave, there are a few things you can do to give yourself the best chance of transitioning back into the workforce successfully.

If you plan to stay in your industry or role, make sure you are up to date on the latest trends and insights. Keeping in touch with colleagues and your network is also a great way to show you are engaged in your area.

You may also take the opportunity to learn a new skill, gain experience or take a course. This may indicate to potential employers that you’re eager to continue learning. Remember to update your resume afterwards.

4. Talk to your employer

Many people returning to work will require flexible workplace arrangements, such as the ability to work from home or only for certain periods of time. Talk to your employer about this early on, then you can create an arrangement that works for both of you.

If you are seeking a new position and know you will need to work from home some days, research employers’ workplace flexibility arrangements. Is there a work-from-home policy? Is work–life balance encouraged? Seek out companies that offer these policies and keep an eye out for organisations with a return-to-work support program.

Some people find that slowly easing back into work sets up a stronger foundation for long term employment. This may mean going back one day a week, then increasing this to two, three or four days. If you think this may work for you, discuss a trial arrangement with your employer.

Return to work with confidence

Returning to work after extended leave can be daunting – but it can also be a great opportunity to develop your skills, connect with a community and achieve new goals.

Reach out to your networks and see how others managed the transtion.  There’s great groups available like Busines Chicks who offer fabulous support to their members.

There are also many financial aspects to consider, so speaking to a financial adviser who understands the latest reforms and your unique situation may give you peace of mind.  I’d love to help!

Look for help to get into the housing market

Governments across the country are offering incentives for first-home buyers. You just have to know where to look.

Buying your own home is the largest purchase most people will make in their lives.

However, a long run of low interest rates has fuelled spectacular dwelling price growth, record housing debt and phenomenal asset values, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. According to the Reserve Bank of Australia, housing prices nationally have increased 7.25 per cent a year, on average, over the past 30 years.

In its Perceptions of Housing Affordability Report 2017, financial analysis and advisory firm CoreLogic says it now takes 1.5 years of household income to save for a 20 per cent deposit on a dwelling compared with 0.8 years 15 years ago.

Nevertheless, there are government incentives to help prospective first-home buyers. Last year’s Federal Budget proposed allowing individuals to make voluntary contributions to their superannuation to save for a deposit.

Super contributions and earnings are taxed at 15%, rather than higher marginal rates. Contributions are limited to $30,000 per person in total and $15,000 per year and both members of a couple could take advantage of the scheme.

Currently, the NSW and Victorian governments are offer first-home buyers:

  • no stamp duty on all homes worth up to $650,000 in NSW and $600,000 in Victoria
  • stamp duty relief for homes worth up to $800,000 in NSW and $750,000 in Victoria
  • a $10,000 grant for builders of new homes worth up to $750,000 and purchasers of new homes worth up to $600,000 in NSW
  • no duty on lenders mortgage insurance in NSW

Most states have first-home buyer grants, and some are making it harder for foreign investors by increasing duties and land taxes and introducing other measures to reduce competition for first-home buyers.

SEEK ADVICE

There are many investment options that can help you build a deposit, but you don’t have to make financial decisions by yourself.

Chat with your Adviser today… or I’m more than happy to help!