Tag Archives: Finances

Get it Together!

There’s so many things that fall into the too hard basket!  Life is busy and there’s so many other priorities!  Just making it through each day and falling into bed at night is a good day’s work for a lot of people.

But, when a tragedy befalls someone near and dear to us, we often see the fallout when people don’t have their sh*t together.  I’m often approached for insurances or to update beneficiaries of a super fund prompted by the life events that happened to ‘someone else.’

So what are the main areas to ‘get on top of’ when it’s time to get your act together?

Here’s my top tips!

  • Make sure your Will is current and reflects your wishes
  • Ensure you have appointed Powers of Attorney – Enduring and Medical
  • Make sure beneficiaries are nominated on Superannuation & Insurance Policies
  • Consolidate those Superannuation funds that you have lying around – or keep them if they have vital insurances
  • Ensure assets are owned correctly and your bank accounts are in order
  • Check over your Insurance Policies – especially Life, TPD, Trauma and Income Protection – are the levels of cover enough?
  • Bring the people who’ll be involved in sorting out your Estate up to date with your wishes
  • Ensure tax returns are up to date and completed annually – personally and for your business entities
  • If you have a partner or family, make them aware of what you’d like to happen
  • Let a couple of different people know where your important documents are stored in the event of the unexpected

Life changes.  Partners can come and go, children grow up and live their own lives, grandchildren arrive and significant people can waltz in and out of our lives.  It may be hassle to work through the list, and yes, some of it may be costly, but if you truly love those you’re leaving behind, one of the best gifts you can leave, is to have your sh*t together.

You really don’t want the crazy ex to benefit from your estate when your gorgeous new partner will be left destitute because you didn’t take the time to update your paperwork!

So, set a date to every year, ensure everything is just how you want it.  It could be on a birthday, an anniversary or at the turn of the calendar or financial year.  Get each area finalised then run an annual check to make sure they still reflect what you’d like to happen when you’re not there to arrange it.

I’ll bet there’s a few people who’ll be very thankful you did.

 

Top 5 Financial Tips

So it wasn’t that long ago that 2017 kicked in and you promised to get on top of your finances this year!  How’s that going for you now that we’re around six weeks in to the new calendar year?

You know what they say about “the best laid plans of mice and men” right?

If you want to break it down into a really easy to follow guide, I’ve got five top tips for you to help get on top of things over the rest of the year…

1. Set goals

Take charge of your financials this year by working out your goals, objectives and priorities and put a plan in place to reach them.  If you want to get rid of credit card debt, increase savings, pay off your mortgage more quickly or boost your superannuation savings, the MoneySmart site has tools to help you work out a plan.  Alternately, hooking up with a financial planner can help you work with a professional money coach to assist you to make it happen, articulate what you’d like to achieve, and give you someone to be accountable to.

2. Map with a budget

As any successful journey begins with a reliable map or an up to date GPS, the path to wealth starts with going back to basics and having an accurate budget.  The thought of doing a budget might make your eyes glaze over, but a budget helps you see where your money is being spent and where you can make changes that will help you build wealth. You can use MoneySmart’s simple money manager to create your budget.  I often recommend clients use it for their budgeting needs.  It’s online, simple to use and comes in a few different languages too.

3. Get a better deal

It’s good to regularly check and make sure you aren’t paying too much for your mortgage, investment or personal loans or insurance policies. Shopping around regularly for the best deals could save you thousands of dollars over the long term. Talk to your lender or mortgage broker about what they can offer.  Different banks have different deals, so they’ll search around for a better deal if they want to keep you as a customer. If they won’t help, feel free to shop around yourself and switch to another option or lender.

Before automatically renewing insurances, check whether your current insurer is giving you the best value for money. You might be able to get a better policy for a lower price or with better conditions.  Often it’s worth asking a broker or agent for help as they have access to different policies and can run comparisons for you based on what’s important to you.

4. Improve your knowledge

It’s long been acknowledged that “knowledge is power.”  Before you commit to any investment opportunity, make sure you understand the features, costs – upfront and ongoing, benefits to you, and all possible risks.  Does the investment fit in with your plan? Don’t invest in something you don’t understand, and “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

Forewarned if forearmed, so equip yourself with as much knowledge as possible. Subscribe to investment magazines, download popular books on the subject, follow experts on social media or if you still feel clueless, engage a financial adviser to assist.

5. Manage Risk

Investing wisely helps build your wealth for the future.  You’ve probably heard of the benefits of compounding interest, so the longer time frame you have, the better off you should be.  All investments involve an element of risk – and often, “higher the risk, the higher the potential return.” Before you invest any money, take the time to understand the risk versus return.  You need to work out your own personal style of investing.  Are you conservative?  balanced?  or an aggressive investor?  Often, we’ll have a different profile for different types of investment.  If you’re younger, you’re likely to have a much more aggressive approach with your superannuation than you would with funds being saved for a housing deposit.

You’ve probably heard “don’t put all your eggs in one basket.”  This is what diversification is all about. By spreading money across different asset classes and industry sectors, you are less likely to be affected by a particular economic event, like a drop in real estate prices, a fall in the share market or in a particular industry or sector.

So work your way through these five tips.  I’d love to hear how they’ve helped you get on top of your finances!!

What does a Brighter Financial Future Look like for You?

What lights your fire financially?  Everyone’s financial future looks different.

For some people, it might be as simple as being completely debt free.  Others couldn’t live without an annual holiday.  Many want the security of a small nest egg or emergency fund being available.  Others would love an investment property.  Whatever it means to you, a brighter financial future can start with a few small changes to how you currently deal with money. The key is usually to establish some good financial habits – no matter where you are right now.

What are some steps you can personally take towards a brighter financial future?   Most often, it starts with living within your means, or spending less than you earn.  I’ll outline a few options and suggest you try a couple to begin with and see what a difference it makes in your personal circumstances.

  1. Track your daily spending habits – get a receipt for everything you purchase and pop it on a spike or in a box for a month.  See what’s really going on with your spending!
  2. Begin a budget.  And before your eyes glaze over, there’s plenty of online calculators that can help you, so you don’t need to do it alone.  Try the ASIC MoneySmart option to kick things off.
  3. Review your spending habits – Do you have the best phone plan?  Are your insurances the best value for coverage and cost?  Are your bank accounts and fees cost effective?  Do you have a low cost loan and a good deal on your mortgage?  Can you cancel some subscriptions you no longer need? There’s lots of comparison sites now available to help!  Where can you cut back?
  4. Start clearing debt – work out what’s the highest interest rate across your various debts – quite often, it’s the credit card or personal loan.  Especially if the debt if not tax-deductible, work out a plan to bring it down more quickly.  Paying the minimum each month, you’ll never get rid of what you owe!  As one clears, cancel or reduce the facility and then start directing those funds towards the next debt.
  5. Is it time to start investing?  As your debt comes down and you no longer need to fund those large payments, can these be directed towards an investment portfolio?  Find out if you’re ready to start investing here.
  6. Take care of your future!  Have you given due care or attention to your retirement savings?  It’s easy to put it on the back burner thinking it’s so far off, but it is your money and needs to be nurtured.  Chances are, the Government’s pension plan will be less and less available over time, so taking care of number one should be higher on your list than it likely already is.  And the longer you have to go, the better compounding interest will work in your favour.

Hopefully, these tips will help set you on the way to a brighter financial future.  I’d love to know if you’ve tried one out and let me know how it’s worked for you!

What does an Adviser really do?

The term financial adviser or financial planner has been around for a long while.

When I left school though, I’d never heard of a Financial Adviser and certainly didn’t know it was a career path, or that it was the one I would take.

I knew about Life Insurance Agents or Brokers, Accountants, Economists and not much else.  So if you’re like I was, and not really sure what a planner did, allow me to enlighten you…

Advisers are Authorised Representatives of an organisation that is licensed by ASIC (the Australian Securities and Investment Commission.)  Some choose to hold their own license, some are through non-aligned companies and others are through big corporates that you may recognise such as AMP, MLC (NAB) or ANZ.

The upshot is, you need to be licensed to give advice and that’s a role we take pretty seriously.  People pay us for what we know, meaning we’re in a very trusted position and one that we don’t take for granted.

When you initially meet or research an Adviser, chances are you’ll be provided with their Financial Services Guide and Adviser Profile.  This outlines what your Adviser is allowed to provide advice on.  Some are very limited and choose to specialise in a particular niche, such as Insurance or Self-Managed Super Funds (SMSF.)  Others are educated in many areas and are called ‘generalists.’  Additional accreditation may be achieved in areas such as Aged Care and SMSFs.

Most covered areas include investments, finances, budgeting, insurance, superannuation, retirement and pre-retirement planning, estate planning, risk management, business risk mitigation and taxation.  Advisers are usually only too happy to let you know the areas that they’re qualified in and can offer advice on.

Chances are, seeing an adviser can add value to your personal financial situation, so why not consider a meeting with a planner real soon!  Most offer their initial consultation at their own time and expense, so what have you got to lose?

Why chat with an Adviser?

With only around 20% of Australians thinking it’s worthwhile seeking professional financial advice, it begs the question – ‘what’s in it for me?’  ‘Why would I see a financial adviser?’

And I can give you 6 pretty good answers to that question!

Firstly, seeing an adviser can help you set and achieve personal financial goals.  Sure, you can do that on your own… but do you?   Most of us fare much better when we share our goals and feel accountable to someone for achieving them.  But then, some never think to set financial goals or have a clue about achieving them.  This is where an adviser can provide much value.

Secondly, we can help you make the most of your money.  Chances are, if your like most you live first and save last… if there’s anything left over.  Advisers can assist with salary packaging, planning, tax minimisation and ensuring you get paid and get to save.

We also know a bit about Centrelink, and have helped some who didn’t even know that they were entitled to the Pension or an Allowance to be able to claim what they’re entitled to.

One of my favourites tho is assisting you to feel more in control of your financial situation.  Knowing that you’ve got a plan, someone to keep you on track and that each year you can see that you’re getting ahead, is priceless!

We all make mistakes, it’s a part of living and learning.  But some of them can be extremely expensive.  Being able to run business, investment and financial deals past an expert who knows their numbers can potentially save hundreds or even thousands of dollars in expensive mistakes!

And finally, we know all about protection.  Having a brilliant financial plan is no good if all that you’ve already worked so hard for isn’t protected.  Ensuring that your own life and the wellbeing of your loved ones is taken care of means real peace of mind.

Now, aren’t they 6 good reasons to make an appointment today?

 

Taking control of your finances after divorce

The key to managing finances after a divorce is to get organised early.  Grab a cuppa and have a read through this short guide for six tips on taking control.

Divorce can be one of the most financially and emotionally stressful experiences of a person’s life. The key to taking control is to get organised early. Acting quickly to organise accounts, update details and make financial plans may help start the next phase of life with more peace of mind.

The following steps are a great place to start.

1.      Get organised

It’s important to keep track of key dates, such as when the separation occurred. It’s also a good idea to arrange a redirection of mail for the party moving out, so you continue to receive mail at the new address.

Both parties should gather all financial information, making sure there are copies of
all documents. Also write a list of all financial and property assets, liabilities and policies, making a note of whose name each document is registered under. This may include:

  • bank, brokerage or investment accounts
  • credit cards
  • vehicle registration
  • life, health, home, car, health and other insurance policies
  • utility bills for electricity, gas, internet and phone
  • property documents such as deeds, mortgage papers and home loan details
  • recent tax returns and tax file numbers
  • superannuation account details
  • will and estate plans
  • rental agreements or leases.

    2.      Close any joint accounts

    It is important to close accounts or credit cards that are in both names and cancel any redraw facilities. This will protect the finances of each individual and ensure no more debt accumulates. Each should then open an account in their own name, which only they can access. They will also need to redirect any income that previously entered a shared account into the new account.  Also check any shared social media or other accounts such as eBay – change of passwords may also be required.

    3.      Review your finances

    Update any remaining accounts, loans or policies so they are registered in just one name.  This can be time consuming, so make a list and tick them off as they’re completed.

    Insurance

    It’s crucial to update insurance policies as any individual not named will not be covered. This individual will need to make sure that they have other cover in place that is adequate and affordable for their needs. Also, remember to update any nominated beneficiaries on new or existing policies.

    Loans

    The person whose name is on a loan agreement is responsible for any debt, regardless of changed personal circumstances. It’s vital for the necessary party to remove their name or for both individuals to pay off the loan.  Sometimes agreements need to be reached prior to the changes being allowed.

    Superannuation

    Superannuation is usually a significant financial asset. Any nominated beneficiaries of the parties’ retirement nest eggs will need to be updated.

    Rent and Utilities

    Updating rental agreements and utilities will be crucial, as the listed person may be left with damage or unpaid bills to cover.

    4.      Change Wills, Powers of Attorney and Beneficiaries

    Many Australians don’t realise that divorce can affect their will. Different states have different laws.

    In Western Australia, for example, divorce automatically revokes a current will. It is vital to update wills to reflect new circumstances as soon as possible.

    To be valid, a will needs to be signed by two witnesses. Drawing up a will can be complex so it is often best to consult a solicitor.  Ask also about reviewing or starting Powers of Attorney.

    5.      Create a new budget

    It can take time to adjust to relying on one income. Creating a budget and financial plan early on can make it easier to track expenses and feel confident that bills and payments will be covered.

    6.      Reach out

    Most of us know someone who’s been there, and that divorce can be a very difficult time. There are many online government resources, as well as legal aid services, counsellors and financial advisers that can provide helpful advice on how to make the process as painless as possible.

    Getting in touch with nearby support services or creating a supportive group of friends is the best way to get a helping hand.

How’s your Relationship with Money?

If you had to define your relationship with money, are you guys going strong? Or due for some serious counselling sessions?

Just remember, like in any relationship, small changes can make a big impact.  Regularly paying attention to our partner can make our emotional bonds stronger, and focusing a little loving attention on our financial relationship can also yield dividends!  (see what I did there?)

It might just be time to sit down and have a stern chat with yourself and bring some clarity into your relationship with the dollars.  Look for ideas on where you can improve.  Observe your friends and family members and their relationship with money.  Are they out every weekend, have all the latest stuff and are constantly bemoaning the fact that they just can’t keep up with their bills?  Or do you have that careful friend, who has a budget and for the most part sticks with it?  They live within their means and still don’t really seem to miss out on too much.

I want you to think who you’d rather be like and five ways you’d like to improve your relationship with money.

  • Do you have personal debt you’d like to pay down or pay off?
  • Is there a holiday you’d like to save for?
  • Would you like to start putting a little more into your superannuation?
  • Is your first home or an investment property something you’d like to achieve?
  • Would you like to start a small share or investment portfolio?
  • Would you like to go to a better gym?
  • Be able to afford a dog?
  • Buy a membership?

Come up with at least five goals that have something to do with money.

Next I want you to prioritise them.  What is the most important objective you have?  Did something stand out as your number one priority?

What love and attention can you bring to this one goal, and what small improvements can you make to start turning things around?  Don’t worry about all the other items on your list.  You can get there later.  Just focus on your main priority and think of ways you can make small changes to make inroads.

If you want to pay down debt, can you skip the daily latte and put the extra $5 per day onto the loan?  That extra $100 per month means you’ll be $1200 further ahead by the end of the year.  Will that help you get there sooner?  As in much sooner?

I’d love to hear some of the ‘little things’ you’ve done to start improving your relationship with money and see if you become more in love than ever once again…