Category Archives: Wealth

Gold! Glorious Gold!…

Recently, I was privileged to be given a tour of Gold Bullion Australia, located in Miami on the Gold Coast, of all places!  If you’re like me, then you probably think of capital cities, bank vaults and the Perth Mint as the places where it all happens in the precious metals arena.  Who knew I could try something so local?

It was pretty brilliant I must say to be able to get my hot little hands on a 1000g bar of gold and eye off the gorgeous ingots of silver and gold… sadly I didn’t get to hide any in the handbag and do a runner!

But when markets look like they may turn south and people traditionally flee to the perceived safety of gold and precious metals, I’m often asked… “How can I invest in Gold?”  (Apparently, ‘try Tiffany’s is the wrong answer!’)

You might be surprised, that there’s actually up to 4 different ways that you can invest in precious metals!

Exchange Traded Funds (ETF’s)

Precious metal Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are the cheapest, easiest and most convenient way to buy and sell gold.   Unlike physical gold however, there are a number of things to be aware of with ETF’s.

Firstly, you can expose yourself to counter-party risk and liquidity may be an issue, meaning you can’t sell out as quickly as you usually could. In short, when you buy an ETF, the metal you buy may not be held by the ETF provider, it’s held by a large global bank.  Just a possibility to be aware of!

Junior Miners

As gold production is primary, there are a selection of mining companies that explore and extract the glittering, precious metal from Mother Earth’s crust.  By investing in these “Junior Miners” you are investing in gold indirectly.  The price of shares in these companies will be affected by the mining stocks as well as many other factors such as the position of the mining company and markets in general.

Futures and options

Futures and options are vehicles known as derivatives which are available to investors via platforms or exchanges.  A futures position can become a physical position in precious metals and they have a delivery mechanism for buyers and sellers.  Options are like an insurance policy on price.  Most use the recommendations of a reputable Stockbroker and/or their Adviser when looking at these style of investments.

Buying Physical Gold

There are many seasoned investors who have been long term loyal fans of physical gold; the real stuff!  I’m kind of a fan of wearing it myself! (All donations graciously accepted!)  They like to be able to hold a tangible asset with no third-party risk which has been a valuable form of currency for over 5,000 years.  And getting your hot little hands on a 1kg bar is seriously a lot of fun – but may make some of the scenes in the Italian Job look a little less real than previously thought…

To Note ~

Gold does not replace income – that is the role of cash and fixed interest or even real estate – what it does do, is provide a non-correlating alternative to traditionally defensive assets.  Unlike property, cash, stocks and bonds, gold is not sensitive to Macroeconomic factors such as inflation and interest rates – in fact, it usually performs better in a volatile market.

Physical gold can be more expensive than investing in an ETF, although since it is an internationally recognised and trusted form of exchange, the worldwide network of dealers can provide prices 24 hours a day and you can exchange gold for cash practically anywhere in the world.

What are the costs?

Dealers charge a premium on the world spot price of gold; there is a production cost depending on the type of product you purchase and there may also be delivery, storage and insurance costs.

If you can buy from a dealer closer to your location, you will also save on the cost of shipping.  For precious metals, this cost can be significant due to their weight and value.  (Wandering out of the vault with a backpack of gold bars isn’t great for the back!)

When it comes time to sell, the dealer will buy back at spot price less a premium.  The dealer will want to see the physical product, so again it is best if your dealer is close by.  Alternatively, you can store your precious metals with the dealer so you can buy and sell instantly with them.  Buying bullion isn’t risk free, but then, there’s not much in life that truly is.  Researching a reputable trader is imperative.

Have a chat to your financial adviser to see whether physical gold, silver, platinum or other investment options are worth a position in your portfolio.

And for those who want to know a little more, here’s an e-book put together by Gold Bullion Australia for your viewing pleasure called “Why Buy Gold.”

Lost Super?

There are about 14.8 million Aussies with a superannuation account, 40% of which hold more than one account.

Some of that 40% make up the $18 billion in ‘lost super’. Is some of that yours?

Find it

Moved home? Changed your job? Don’t quite remember where your teenage self stashed your super? It’s really pretty easy to track it down.

Combine it

Save on fees, reduce your paperwork, keep track of your hard earned money, grow your retirement fund.  But maybe get advice first!  If your health has changed and getting new insurance is problematic, it may be worth keeping more than one account open.

Get online

Many websites and super funds offer to help find and combine your super. It is quick, easy and free. You can check with your known superannuation provider/s, your MyGov site or the Australian Tax Office.

Grow it

A qualified financial adviser can help you find an appropriate superannuation fund that will grow your hard-earned income ready for your retirement – and the sooner you get on top of this, the better!

Fees are just part of the story, do you also know how your fund has performed?  Are you able to choose your own insurance levels?  Or opt-out of insurance if not required?  Do you know your investment risk profile and which style of investing is best for you?

Truth is, most of us get excited when we find $20 in a pocket or an old handbag… your superannuation is likely worth thousands, and it is YOUR money!  Take care of it!

 

Source: https://www.ato.gov.au/About-ATO/Research-and-statistics/In-detail/Super-statistics/Super-accounts-data/Super-accounts-data-overview/

What should I expect when seeing an Adviser?

What should I expect at my first meeting?

Your initial consultation with a financial planner will give you a chance to get to know each other.  Most provide an initial consultation at their own time and expense.

Your financial planner will explain how their service works, and how it can work for you.  You should receive a Financial Services Guide and an Adviser Profile and have these documents explained to you.  You’ll have the opportunity to talk about your current financial situation and your financial goals.

Some questions to consider before your first meeting:

  • Reflect on what you want in life. Start with the next few years. Are there any changes you’d like to make, or things you’d like to do? What about 5, 10 or 25 years from now? Where do you want to live? What do you want to be doing?  Is retirement on your radar?  Are there specific goals you’d like to meet in the near future?
  • Consider your attitude to money.  Are you a spender or a saver? A risk taker or someone who prefers more certainty? When it comes to spending and managing money, what do you enjoy and what keeps you awake at night?  You can complete a Risk Profile questionnaire that can provide you with you personal risk profile in relation to different investments.  You might be much more aggressive when investing your superannuation than you would be if saving for a home deposit.
  • Think about the financial issues you find most challenging.  Where do you think you could be making better decisions?  What do you think you need to better understand?  Do you know you have downfalls in specific areas?

Talk to your spouse or partner about these issues too. When you visit a financial planner, you’ll want to discuss what it is you want to achieve together as well as your individual dreams.

Many people also neglect to educate their children about money.  What issues did you wish you knew about when you were younger.  Is there something you could pass on to make their life a little easier going forward?

What to bring along

To help your financial planner gain a clearer understanding of your current finances and the services that could be right for you, a little preparation can go a long way. If possible, try to gather the following information before your first consultation:

  • Your income. If it’s easier, feel free to bring in tax documents, especially if you have income from multiple sources or you’re self-employed.  Otherwise, a recent payslip is helpful.
  • Your assets. Including property, superannuation, savings and investments.  Do you also have different structures like Trusts that hold assets?
  • Your budget.  An estimate of where your money goes each month, including your mortgage or rent, personal or business loans and credit card debt will be helpful.
  • Insurance covers. Especially life, disability and income protection policies, if you have them.
  • Questions. In addition to a list of your short and long-term financial objectives, bring any questions or concerns you may have.  And write them down so you don’t forget any!

Your first meeting is informal so don’t worry about gathering all the details if you can’t lay your hands on everything.  The important thing is to get started thinking about your financial future.  If you choose to proceed with your Adviser, you can nail the details in subsequent meetings.

To find out more, contact us and we can guide you through the process.

Educate yourself on financial advice

You might be surprised to know, that working out how to achieve your financial goals is easy and you don’t have to earn a high income to do it.

Whether you’re looking to get your financial affairs in order, buy a first or subsequent home, start a family or prepare for your retirement, seeking quality advice from a qualified financial expert can help you achieve your goals sooner, and with more confidence.

So just what is financial advice?

Financial advice is about much more than just making money. It’s about creating new opportunities to help you achieve whatever you desire in life. A financial planner can help work out what’s important to you. They can help develop a plan that aligns your financial decisions to your lifestyle goals.

Priorities can change over time, as can economic conditions, government legislation and investment markets. Advisers can help re-focus your plan, track your progress and keep you accountable along the way, whether you’re starting out, building wealth or planning for retirement.

Seeking financial advice will help you identify solutions to important questions like:

  • Will I have enough income to live comfortably in retirement?
  • Is my family protected should something unexpected happen – what do I need to know about life insurance?
  • How can I make sure I have enough money to fund my children’s education?
  • How can I invest and structure my finances in the most tax effective way?
  • How can I manage my debt and pay off my home sooner?
  • How can I make my money work harder for me?
  • What’s the best structure to protect my investments and assets?
  • How can I maximise my entitlements to government benefits?
  • How does estate planning fit?

At its best, financial advice is an ongoing long-term partnership centered entirely on your goals.

If you’re weighing up whether financial advice is right for you, consider booking an initial complimentary obligation free appointment.  We’d be happy to help!

Get Retirement Ready!

Planning is key… and so is getting advice!

Avoiding pinching pennies in retirement because you haven’t saved enough means serious planning.

First, figure out how much you’ll need!

Find out how much income you will need by answering a few simple questions:

  • What are your personal retirement goals?  Do they include climbing mountains, lawn bowls, sky-diving or spoiling the grand kids?
  • What kind of lifestyle do you want?  Are you quite frugal or want to live it up?
  • What is your life expectancy?  Do you have good genes and are likely to outlast your cronies?  Or have you lived a little harder than most and might not see the great-grand kids arrive?

While it’s relatively easy to set goals and have some lifestyle expectations for retirement, estimating how long you’ll live can be tricky, but is crucial to your retirement decisions. It can help decide your own asset allocation or when to stop working to ensure you have enough funds for your retirement.

Although there are tools and calculators you can use for working out life expectancy, your financial adviser can help guide you through the process too. Your adviser can also help you come up with an estimate of your required retirement income based on your lifestyle expectations, risk profile and life expectancy.

Second, ensure you’ll have enough income!

With an estimate of how much you’ll personally need, your adviser can make recommendations to help you meet your required retirement income. These strategies may include transition to retirement or contribution strategies, growing your retirement fund by investing some or all of it or even growing wealth outside of superannuation.

Most investment products carry some sort of risk, so it’s important to choose ones that suit your risk appetite and need for returns.

If you want a regular flow of income in your retirement, there are options available for you, as well as ensuring you won’t outlive your funds.

Always seek professional advice and how you can get appropriate outcomes for you.  And of course, I’d love to help!

Create a great financial new year

New Year’s resolutions are easy to make but often hard to keep. But there are real benefits to making financial resolutions. Here are some helpful suggestions to get you started.

Chances are by now, you’ve forgotten what you wanted to achieve last New Year’s Eve, but a new financial year is also a great time to reset.

Get back to basics

If you find it near-impossible to reach your financial goals, you may need to revisit the basics: sticking to a budget. Does temptation usually unravel all your good saving intentions? Consider opening a locked savings account that you can’t deduct money from for a period of time, and automatically transfer funds into it each payday.  Automating everything in your life that can be is truly a gift!

Plan for large purchases

Whether you need a new fridge or are considering placing a deposit on a home, the earlier you start planning for these purchases, the more manageable they become.

If you know you’ll need a new item in 6 months that costs $1,000,  that means you need to set aside around $40 per week to make it happen… that’s a few sneaky coffees that may need to go!

Set up an investment plan

If you’re considering investing this year (instead of someday,) developing a sound investment plan is essential for your success. This may include working with your financial adviser to identify clear financial targets, calculate how much you can afford to invest and determine how much risk you’re willing to take on. 

If you’d like to have a small nest egg before you sit down with someone, again, automate the process so every week you’re setting aside an amount to put towards that portfolio.  Everyone started somewhere!

Review insurance policies

Knowing you are properly insured provides peace of mind if your circumstances change unexpectedly. But identifying appropriate insurance policies and levels of coverage for your unique situation can be difficult – and getting it wrong is risky… as you’ll likely find at claim time. This is why it’s important to regularly review your insurance policies with your financial adviser, especially if your situation changes.

You may be able to find that funding via various structures frees up cash flow to invest in personal insurances you may not have otherwise been able to afford.  Good advice is worth every cent!

Check your super

If you have multiple superannuation accounts – or have forgotten where your super is – you’re not alone. According to the Australian Taxation Office, there’s $18 billion of lost super waiting to be claimed nationally.1

Effectively managing your super is vital for building your retirement nest egg. Contact your financial adviser who may help you manage your super.  It’s also worth seeing what insurances are covered in your fund so you aren’t paying extra for cover you don’t need.

Set retirement goals

The earlier you set clear goals for your retirement, the more options you’ll have. Work out what assets you have – from your home to superannuation – and review your current spending patterns, then determine your goals for retirement and what lifestyle you’d like to enjoy. This will help you calculate how much you’ll need.

Remember, we’re now living a lot longer, which means our money may now need to last 30 years in retirement, or we may choose to work longer.  Our health is also an issue that needs consideration as we age and this too will impact our retirement years.

Create an estate plan

Estate planning involves more than writing a will. It outlines what you want done with your documents, contacts, debts, bills and assets, making the process easier for your beneficiaries after you’ve passed away.

Whatever your financial New Financial Years’ resolution may be, seeking professional advice may help you make it reality this year.

 

Note:
1 The Sydney Morning Herald, 2017, ‘Almost $18b in lost super waiting to be claimed’. Accessible at:

http://www.smh.com.au/money/super-and-funds/tax-office-holds-records-of-almost-18-billion-in-lost-super-20170920-gylo3z.html

Do you have a valid will?

Creating a valid will is one of the most important things you can do to protect your loved ones.

Here we explain how to go about it.

1. Seek legal advice

While DIY will kits can seem like an easy and inexpensive way to make a will, they can be fraught with pitfalls.

Your affairs are probably more complex than you think – your family home, other properties, business assets, superannuation, investments and personal belongings.  You may be surprised to learn that not all assets are covered as standard in a Will and stay outside of your estate.  Having a properly drawn up will helps to determine who gets what and can save your family time and stress when you are gone.  And not all assets are automatically included in your estate and may need separate provision made to ensure their distribution.

Your lawyer or financial planner will also be able to provide insights into how to best structure your will, both to protect assets and to minimise tax. Examples include setting up a testamentary trust to provide for minors or protecting your estate from creditors.

2. Safeguard your children’s future

Probably one of the most important reasons to make a will is to ensure any dependent children are well cared for should the worst happen.

Sydney wills, probate and estate specialist, Graeme Heckenburg of Heckenberg Lawyers, says generally parents should make separate rather than joint wills, as they are likely to die at different times.

Heckenburg says a will should also appoint a guardian to take care of the day to day living and housing arrangements for the children and a trustee to execute the will and make any financial decisions. This can be one person or two different people.

“If you don’t appoint a guardian and there are young children, ultimately the decision will be made by the Guardianship Tribunal [in NSW]. If the guardianship is contested, the matter could even end up in the Supreme Court,” he says.

If you have adult children, you also need to consider their circumstances.  If they’re caught up in a divorce or bankruptcy issues, any inheritance can form part of their assets, which may not be what you wish.

Vulnerable adult children also need to be considered as receiving a large lump sum may not be in their best interests either.

3. Keep your will updated

Once you have made a will, don’t leave it in a drawer gathering dust.

Circumstances change over time, and often quickly, so ensure your will reflects your current situation, particularly if your spouse has died, you have married, re-married or divorced or you have become a parent or step-parent.

We’d love to help or put in touch with our legal experts who can assist with your estate planning.