Category Archives: money

Women’s Money Toolkit

I’m a big fan of ASIC’s MoneySmart website and love their Women’s Toolkit.  Have you had a chance to check it out as yet?

The women’s money toolkit has been designed with tips and tools to help you manage your money, gain an edge on your finances and deal with life’s ups and downs.  And we know there’s plenty of them!

The kit was developed because women face unique financial challenges such as having less super than men, living longer and taking time out of paid work to care for others.

It’s designed to have you answer some simple questions and receive a tailored list of topics that may include having a baby, relationships and money, sorting out your super and many more.

Create a personalised to-do list of the actions you need to focus on right now to make the most of your money and enhance your well being.

Remember, you can always:

Do yourself and favour and check it out here: ASIC Women’s Toolkit

Women & Superannuation

I’ve met plenty of people skeptical about our superannuation system over my years as a planner and I get it.  Believe me, I have to devote hours ever year to keeping up with the annual federal budget, managing legislative changes and getting my head around constantly changing tax and super laws.  It can be a drag!

It’s also true that we retire with about half the retirement savings of most men, and some women retire with no super at all!  But the reality is this, women live longer than men, making it even more essential that they accumulate enough superannuation to last them through retirement.

Having said that, women also face unique challenges when it comes to putting away retirement savings. Chances are, you’re still on lower pay than your male counterparts, you’ll take more time out of the workforce to raise the kids or care for your parents, and for those running a single-parent household, it can make it even more challenging to build a reasonable amount of super savings.

However, there are some simple strategies make it possible for women to overcome some of these hurdles, or make them less of an issue anyway…

Try and remember, that superannuation is actually your friend.  It is a very tax-effective way to save retirement. Your super fund pays a low rate of tax on contributions and investment earnings while growing your nest egg.  From age 60, you can withdraw your super tax-free.

Without any superannuation savings, many women are forced to rely solely on the age pension in their senior years.  Remember, the pension is designed as a safety net and won’t provide at all for a comfortable old age.  I’m not sure I could go back to a lifestyle that’s funded on around $23,000 per annum and you probably don’t want to either!

Firstly, don’t let your super funds get ‘lost.’  Try and ensure your funds are consolidated – this can help save on fees, but make sure you’re not losing valuable insurance coverage when doing so.  When possible, try to put extra away into super.  The ATO and website MyGov are making it easier than ever now to stay on top of your funds.

Affording an extra $20 – $50 per week now may not take food off the table but the additional money, plus years of compound interest will add up, and after all, your investing in your future self.  Sounds like a win to me!

Understand your fund and make sure your employer is putting your full entitlements in regularly on your behalf.  At the time of writing, this was 9.5% of your gross wage. Mostly now, we have super choice meaning that we’re able to choose the fund we want, and then check where your money is invested within the fund.  Is it in line with your investment profile?

To grow your fund, you’re often able to make pre-tax contributions (Salary Sacrifice) or even post-tax contributions where no tax is charged.  Depending on your circumstances, your partner may also be able to make contributions on your behalf and receive a tax offset for their efforts.

However you go about it, remember that you’re investing in your future and that superannuation is your money.  It certainly pays to be savvy with your super!  Sitting down with your financial adviser may reveal new and innovative ways you can make the most of your retirement savings!

The Truth about Investing

Plenty of people tell me, “I’ll come and see you when I have money to invest!”  Great!!  (Mostly, I’m still waiting…)

So how much does it really take to start investing?

Truth is, you really don’t need a lot.  Some start with a small lump sum and others put small amounts away regularly.  It’s really what’s best for you.

The best advice I can give you for free… is to start!  Then keep adding to your investments regularly.

You’ve probably heard it before, but remember – don’t put all your eggs in one basket! And, the higher the earnings or return you expect from an investment, the more risky it’s likely to be. Investments that offer lower returns are generally less risky.

A financial adviser can assist in working out your risk profile – that’s the level of risk you’re comfortable with, and that can depend on what you’re investing or saving for.  You may have a much higher tolerance for volatility for your superannuation or retirement funds than you would when saving for the deposit on a home.

Advisers are also qualified to assist when you’ve had an inheritance, lost or divorced a partner or had a major change in circumstances.

Sit down and work out your personal budget and see just what’s left each pay period that you can use to either bring down debt or start your savings plan today!  If you don’t know where to start, an adviser can definitely assist.  So stop putting it off and waiting for the magic to happen… chances are you’re more likely to get ahead by starting, than waiting.

The end of another Financial Year

It’s hard to believe we’ve just clocked the end of another financial year.  It really doesn’t seem that long ago we just completed our last round of tax returns!  I hope you managed to make the most of your deductions and income.

And it’s been a big year too for what was formerly known as the financial planning industry.  2016 is the year the Government began to view us as a profession… although, you may agree that that still needs a bit of work.

Now is the time where many advisers will have to choose whether or not they will earn the right to continue as planners.  The proper qualifications will be needed and recognised, ongoing training and accountability measures will be put into place, and all are aimed at protecting the consumer.  That’s a win, right?

Building consumer trust has always been the end game and following in it’s wake, better recognition and respect for professional planners.

We’ve also managed to have enshrined the terms Financial Planner and Financial Adviser which will make it easier for the public to find professionals to provide them with advice.  From 1 January, 2019, anyone claiming to be a financial planner without the qualifications to do so, will be breaking the law, so you’re less likely to end up in the wrong hands.  Another win!

So, we’re pretty sure you’ve had a big financial year, and we hope you’re set for an even more cracking year ahead.

It’s time to take a load off and enjoy the weekend.

Happy EOFY everyone!

 

Mother’s Day

Most of us wouldn’t doubt for a second the love and advice of our mothers.

From when we were very small, they’ve watched over us, with those eyes in the back of their head, and given us the wisdom of their guidance (which we may now have passed on to our own children… or view as incredibly bizarre!)

And whatever you do to celebrate Mother’s Day, we hope it’s a good one for you.  For those who’ve lost their mums or a having their first Mother’s Day without mum around, it’s going to be a tough one.  Try and remember all the wonderful times you had, the love and smiles and great moments you shared.

I came across one very special gift that i think mums of young ones everywhere would approve of:

  • Celebrate your kid’s mother this year by giving her a time machine – that is, a return to a life before diapers, sleepless nights, and the pressure to always be thinking of everything at once.

Sounds like a winning idea to me!

And whether you get breakfast in bed, a pasta necklace or something amazing, I don’t know too many mums who won’t value the greatest gift of all, your time.

How Budget 2017 may affect families

The announcements in this update are proposals unless stated otherwise. These proposals need to successfully pass through Parliament before becoming law and may be subject to change during this process. 

  • The Medicare levy will increase by 0.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent from 1 July 2019
  • The Government will spend $37.3 billion on child care over four years
  • Additional education funding has been set at $18.6 billion over 10 years
  • University student fees will increase by 7.5 per cent by 2021
  • University graduates will start repaying their loans when they reach an income level of $42,000 a year, down from approximately $55,000
  • Family Tax Benefit Part A payments will not be indexed for two years
  • Doctors will be encouraged to prescribe generic drugs to save the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme $1.8 billion over five years
  • No changes to negative gearing

Overview

Medicare levy

In health care, the Medicare levy will increase on 1 July 2019 by 0.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent of taxable income to help fund the $22 billion National Disability Insurance Scheme. Treasurer Scott Morrison says all Australians need to support the disability scheme, even if they aren’t directly affected.

Child care

The Government will invest $37.3 billion in child care over four years to help about 1 million families, including those that need before and after school care for their children. A single, simplified, means-tested child care subsidy will provide more support for the families who need it the most from 2 July 2018.

The subsidy will introduce hourly rate caps and remove unnecessary regulation to allow providers to offer more flexible hours of care. The child care subsidy will be payable only to families with incomes below $350,000 per annum (in 2017-18 terms) from 2 July 2018. The upper income threshold of $350,000 per annum will be indexed annually by CPI from 1 July 2018.

A further $428 million will be provided to extend the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to early childhood education for the 2018 school year to allow access to a quality preschool education.

Schools funding

This Budget will invest $18.6 billion in extra schools funding over the next 10 years, in accordance with the Gonski needs-based standard. Funding for each student across all sectors will grow at an average of 4.1 per cent a year.

However, university fees will rise by $2,000 to $3,600 for a four-year course and students will have to start paying back their debt when they earn more than $42,000 from July next year, down from the current level of approximately $55,000. A 2.5 per cent efficiency dividend will be applied to universities for the next two years.

First-home buyers

First-home buyers will be able to use voluntary contributions to their existing superannuation funds to save for a house deposit. Contributions and earnings will be taxed at 15%, rather than marginal rates, and withdrawals will be taxed at their marginal rate, less 30% tax offset. Contributions will be limited to $30,000 per person in total and $15,000 per year. Both members of a couple can take advantage of the scheme. Non-concessional contributions can also be made but will not benefit from the tax concessions apart from earnings being taxed at 15%.

The States will be required to deliver on housing supply targets and reform their planning systems and a $1 billion National Housing Infrastructure Facility will aim to remove infrastructure impediments to developing new homes.

In Melbourne, Defence Department land at Maribyrnong will be released for a new suburb that could cater for 6,000 new homes. A new National Housing Finance and Investment Corporation will be established by July 1, 2018, to provide long-term, low-cost finance for more affordable rental housing.

States and Territories will be encouraged to transfer stock to the community housing sector and managed Investment trusts will be allowed to develop and own affordable housing. The incentive for investors will include a capital gains tax discount of 60 per cent, and direct deduction of rent from welfare payments from tenants.

Australians over the age of 65 will be able to make a non-concessional contribution of up to $300,000 each into their superannuation fund from the proceeds of the sale of their principal home from 1 July  2018.

Family Tax Benefits

The current Family Tax Benefit Part A payments will not be indexed for two years from 1 July 2017. Indexation will resume on 1 July 2019. A 30¢ in the dollar income test taper will apply under Method 1 for Family Tax Benefit Part A families with household incomes above the Higher Income Free Area (currently $94,316) from 1 July 2018. Entitlements under Family Tax Benefit Part A may be worked out using two income tests, with the one giving the highest rate applying. Method 1 sometimes produces a higher result for larger families.

 

What’s next?

Most changes must be legislated and passed through Parliament before they apply. If you think you may be impacted by some of the Budget’s proposed changes, you should consider seeking professional advice. A financial adviser can give you a clear understanding of where you stand and how you can manage your cash flow, super and investments in light of proposed changes.

 

If any of these proposals raise questions, concerns or potential opportunities for you, please speak with your financial adviser today. These opportunities apply to Australian consumers.

How Budget 2017 may affect Wealth Accumulators

The announcements in this update are proposals unless stated otherwise. These proposals need to successfully pass through Parliament before becoming law and may be subject to change during this process.

  • First-home buyers have the opportunity to save a deposit through voluntary contributions to superannuation
  • No changes to negative gearing or capital gains tax
  • Accommodation and travel deductions will be disallowed for residential rental property
  • Small businesses with a turnover up to $10 million can write off expenditure up to $20,000 for a further year
  • Depreciation deductions for plant and equipment on residential investment properties will be limited
  • The Medicare Levy will increase by 0.5% to 2.5% of taxable income on 1 July 2019
  • Budget projected to return to balance in 2020–21 and remain in surplus over the medium term
  • Capital gains tax rules for foreign investors will be tightened
  • Foreign investment rules will be changed to discourage investors from leaving properties vacant.

 

Overview

To address the desire for many first home buyers to enter the market, the Budget proposes they will be able to use voluntary contributions to their existing superannuation funds to save for a house deposit. Contributions and earnings will be taxed at 15%, rather than marginal rates, and withdrawals will be taxed at their marginal rate, less a 30% tax offset. Contributions will be limited to $30,000 per person in total and $15,000 per year. Both members of a couple can take advantage of the scheme. Non-concessional contributions can also be made but will not benefit from the tax concessions apart from earnings being taxed at 15%.

The States will be required to deliver on housing supply targets and reform their planning systems and a $1 billion National Housing Infrastructure Facility will aim to remove infrastructure impediments to developing new homes.

States and Territories will be encouraged to transfer stock to the community housing sector and managed Investment trusts will be allowed to develop and own affordable housing. The incentive for investors will include a capital gains tax discount of 60%, and direct deduction of welfare payments from tenants.

There are no changes to negative gearing, but tougher rules on foreign investment in residential real estate remove the main residence capital gains tax exemption and tighten compliance. An annual Levy of at least $5,000 will also apply to all future foreign-owned properties that are vacant for at least 6 months each year. In addition, it is proposed that developers also won’t be allowed to sell more than 50% of new developments to foreign investors, which may make it easier for Australian residents to enter the market.

What’s next?

Most changes must be legislated and passed through Parliament before they apply. If you think you may be impacted by some of the Budget’s proposed changes, you should consider seeking professional advice. A financial adviser can give you a clear understanding of where you stand and how you can manage your cash flow, super and investments in light of proposed changes.

 

If any of these proposals raise questions, concerns or potential opportunities for you, please speak with your financial adviser today. This article is relevant for Australian consumers.