Punch and Judy do Super Splitting

This one is for our Aussie readers and a great strategy for some couples to help manage their retirement savings.  If you’re an international reader, does your government offer something similar?  I’d love to hear how it’s done in your country.

A spouse contribution split can help reduce a member’s total superannuation (retirement savings) balance below a trigger point or, when used as an ongoing annual strategy, can help achieve a measure of account equalisation between spouses.  It can also be helpful to reduce a super balance where one spouse is somewhat older than another.

Firstly, to be eligible, the receiving spouse must be under 65 and, if over preservation age, not retired. (Where the receiving spouse turns 65 during the year of the split, action will need to take place before their birthday and is paid as a rollover super benefit.)

Too much jargon right?   So what does it look like?

Punch and Judy are married.  Punch is now the sole breadwinner as Judy wants to stay home for a couple of years while The Baby is still cute.  She’s not earning and her Super retirement savings will be impacted.

Punch is on a good wicket and gets a hefty amount paid into his Super fund by his employer.  Because Judy is amazing, and doing a brilliant job with their kid, Punch wants to make sure she’s not disadvantaged and chooses to split his super with her.

Punch has a sufficient account balance and as his boss has put in a $25,000 contribution, he can pass over up to 85% or $21,250 to Judy’s fund.  Happy wife, happy life!

Punch is a good partner, be like Punch… (ok, he’s usually a tosser, but this time he’s nice!)

Contributions splitting does not reduce the contributions originally made for the member for reporting and contribution caps purposes.

If you think Super Splitting could be beneficial for your family, it’s worth chatting with an adviser to find out more to find out the tips and traps and whether it’s right for you.

Five ways to Stick to your Resolutions

Did you set a financial goal for the New Calendar Year? Did you take steps to make it work?

Is your New Year’s Resolution now a dim, distant memory?  If you’re like most, chances are, it’s now in the too hard basket, life got in the road and you’ve really moved on…

But how can we boost our chances of sticking to our financial resolutions? Here are five practical tips to help you get back on track…

1. Was it an attainable goal?

It’s good to be ambitious, but you may have a better chance of sticking to your resolution if you have a smaller, and more reachable goals along the way.

Using the well-established and well-known SMART formula may help.  SMART stands for:

  • Specific – make your goal as clear as possible.
  • Measurable – specific goals are usually more measurable
  • Achievable – can you reach your goal in the foreseeable future
  • Relevant – do you really want this goal and you’re sure it would benefit you?
  • Time – set a timeline to achieving your target

2. Having a plan

Creating a plan that can help you take small but regular steps toward reaching your financial goal is vital. The key is to set specific milestones and a time frame for each. You may wish to talk to a friend who will keep you accountable, or your financial adviser about setting a plan for your financial situation and goal/s.

3. Announce it

Tell your family or friends about your resolution, or post it on social media. Shout it from the rooftops!  By making your resolution known, you may feel more responsible for sticking to it.

4. Track progress

Record and analyse your progress against milestones. Are you reaching those smaller goals along the way?  It could help to get your financial adviser to check your progress every so often.

5. Enjoy the process

Enjoying the process of reaching your goal may help you stick to your financial resolution. Give yourself a small reward or high-five every time you hit one of your milestones.

Whether you want to boost your savings, pay down debt or up your retirement fund, your financial adviser may be able to help you stay on track to achieve your resolution.  We’d be happy to be your accountability buddy!

Four ways to manage the rising cost of living

Be smart with your spending.

The increasing cost of goods and services is a reality most Australians have to deal with.  It’s certainly not getting any easier to ‘make ends meet.’  Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) shows that living expenses for employee households were up by 2% in September 2018 compared to just a year ago.1

But there’s no need for panic! By being organised and smart with your finances, you could manage rising costs without draining the savings… provided you have any!

1. Cut back on major expenses

Trimming your expenses is one of the easier ways to manage the high cost of living. But rather than taking a piece-meal approach, it may be more effective to cut back on some of the large drains on your earnings, such as food and transport costs.  Take those leftovers to work!  Compare the costs of major must haves like energy bills and be sure to review insurance expenses.  There’s many comparison sites, brokers and advisers who can help you get a better deal or ensure what you have is right for you.

2. Reduce lifestyle costs

It may be worth auditing your lifestyle costs to see if these too could decrease. While you don’t have to give up all the things you enjoy, cutting down on, for example, your overseas holidays or dining out could go a long way in reducing your costs.  Maybe instead of a meal out every week, you cut that to fortnightly.  Perhaps every second year you go off-shore rather than every year.  Check for those cheaper vouchers or groupon deals before heading out to the movies, shows or restaurants.

3. Create a budget

Having a budget and sticking to it may also help you minimise unnecessary expenses. As boring as it sounds, a budget tracks your weekly or monthly spending and may help ensure you have enough money to cover essentials, build up your savings and handle unexpected or increased costs. You may wish to consider working with a professional financial adviser or using software that links with your bank accounts to create a budget that factors in your income, expenses and financial obligations.

Knowing your numbers is vital to staying on top of it all.  Being frugal has a whole new lease of life – check out those dedicated to keeping on top of it all online.

4. Supplement your income

Increasing your income may be another way to ride out the rising cost of living.  Go ahead and ask for that pay rise!  You could take on extra work in your spare time or start a side hustle.  Perhaps you could become a private tutor in your field of expertise, rent out your spare room sometimes or pet sit.  Even selling old unused clothes, sporting equipment or items no longer needed could assist.

If you have enough savings on top of your contingency fund, you may want to invest to grow your capital and earn interest. Your financial adviser may recommend strategies to help you generate an income from your investments.

The high cost of living may affect your savings and lead to money-related stress. But if you’re smart about your finances, you can still keep your cost of living in check and remain financially secure.

 

1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, September 2018, ‘Selected Living Cost Indexes, Australia’. Accessible at: 

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/PrimaryMainFeatures/6467.0?