6 ways to get the most out of a financial windfall

Received a large sum of money? Lucky you! By taking practical steps, you can ensure your newfound wealth goes much further…

Research has shown that on average, people who receive an inheritance spend about half of it.1  So how can you be that amazing and eminently sensible one who makes sure your windfall doesn’t just vanish but helps you build a secure financial future? Here are six smart ways.

1. Set money aside

To avoid the temptation of spending it impulsively, rashly and super quickly, you could put the money away temporarily in a deposit account or short-term investment. Leaving the sum aside for one or two months may give you more time to plan, have a think about what you’d like or to engage a professional financial adviser for guidance on using the money wisely.

2. Settle debts

Using a windfall to clear debts can put you on a better financial footing. Consider working with your financial adviser to create a budget that considers all your debt obligations, income and windfall. This can also be a good chance to discuss the opportunity to invest and grow your money.

3. Grow the emergency fund

Building up your emergency fund – or creating one if you haven’t got one – can be another way to make good use of the funds. By increasing the emergency stash to cover expenses for six months, you may be better positioned to handle unexpected events such as a job loss, illness or accidents.  Working out where best to put that can also be done with the assistance of an adviser.

4. Beef up retirement savings

Making extra contributions to your superannuation may help you optimise your windfall. Whether you make non-concessional contributions or, if you are employed, arrange to have a portion of your pre-tax salary paid to your super, increasing your retirement savings can help you secure your financial future.  And don’t get me started on how compound interest can help you out here over all those years to retirement too!

5. Fund your goals

Take the opportunity to build savings for some of your personal goals, such as higher education or travelling to places on your bucket list.  Maybe consider doing this only after you’ve paid off debt and built up that emergency stash!

6. Give to others

Receiving a large windfall can be a chance to help others in need. If you decide to give some money away to those less fortunate, consider donating it to an organisation that’s entitled to receive tax-deductible gifts, so you can claim a tax deduction.  Being philanthropic feels good too!  Websites now also have to tell you how much of the money actually gets to where it’s needed and what is spent on administrative purposes.

Chances are, your future self will be pretty chuffed with you doing such great ‘adulting!’

infographic_six-ways-to-get-the-most-out-of-a-windfall_v2_fsp

 

1. The Ohio State University, 2012, ‘Most Americans Save Only about Half of their Inheritances, Study Finds’. Available at: https://news.osu.edu/most-americans-save-only-about-half-of-their-inheritances-study-finds—ohio-state-research-and-innovation-communications/.

Tips to manage your money when in a relationship

It may sound bleedingly obvious, but couples can reach their shared goals by keeping their finances healthy.

Whether saving for a house or holiday or seeking to grow or preserve wealth, couples can reach their common goals by managing money well. Here are some practical tips for managing your finances together.

Talk about it, talk about it, talk about it, yeh…

At the risk of sounding like a lyric, it’s important for couples to talk to each other about their finances and how to manage them, to avoid any potential conflict. Discuss your financial situation and goals, and any concerns you may have.  Chances are, you may have grown up with wildly different parenting styles when it comes to money, and your personal ideas about money are brought to the joint kitchen table. The American Psychological Association also suggests talking about your beliefs about money to help you better understand each other and set the stage for healthy conversations.[1]  You may hold the ideas your parents instilled, or have vastly different beliefs about money.

Set goals

Couples often have wide ranging and different priorities, but this doesn’t mean you can’t set common financial goals and work together to save for them. Keeping an open line of communication about your aspirations may help you adjust personal priorities to achieve shared goals.  Everything from big ticket household items, new cars, holidays and babies can be covered here.

Divvy up responsibilities

Sharing responsibilities for paying joint expenses and building savings may help ensure you and your partner are on the same page when it comes to finances. You can opt to split those responsibilities equally or put the main breadwinner in charge of most of them. Whatever you choose, it’s important both are happy with the decision.  Some enjoy maintaining their own personal accounts and contribute a set amount to a ‘family account’ to cover all joint expenses and debts.

Create a budget

A budget usually tracks your spending on a weekly or monthly basis, but often the very mention of the word can make eyes glaze over and you suddenly find that doing the ironing is actually more interesting. So, if a budget isn’t your thing, simply agree on how you will spend – and save – your money.

Build your funds

If you are married or in a de facto relationship, you may want to consider helping each other build retirement funds. You might explore contributing to your partner’s superannuation account if your partner is not working or earns a low income.

Before you make such an arrangement, it is wise to get professional advice on how it works. Your financial adviser may talk you through the rules of spouse contributions and the requirements to become eligible for a tax offset.

Bet we can help with some other stuff too!

 

[1] The American Psychological Association, ‘Happy couples: How to avoid money arguments’. Available at http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/money-conflict.aspx.

Here’s why you need income protection

Your ability to earn an income is usually one of your biggest assets, so why not protect it?

Income Prot

A sudden illness or injury can keep you from working and leave you in financial difficulty. You may get help from a worker’s compensation payout or personal savings, but are they enough to help you meet your expenses and financial obligations?

Taking out an income protection (IP) plan may help provide peace of mind that you’ll be able to meet your financial responsibilities and focus on recovering. IP cover may provide a monthly income while you’re unable to work as a result of illness or injury. It generally replaces up to 75 per cent of your income for a set period of time.

Standalone or through super?

Getting your IP cover through your superannuation fund may be a good idea if you want to avoid paying for your insurance out of pocket. But keep in mind that the policies offered through super may not cover all your financial obligations for an extended period of time.

A standalone IP policy may provide more adequate coverage. It may also offer you tax benefits – IP premiums are usually tax deductible when you fund your cover outside super.

Making your policy affordable

If cost is a concern in taking out a standalone plan, there are a few ways you may be able to make your premiums more affordable. One of them could be choosing a longer waiting period before you receive benefits after being unable to work due to illness or injury. Generally, the longer you wait, the lower the premiums you have to pay.

Opting for indemnity cover may also help you keep your insurance costs down. You’ll have to choose between indemnity and agreed-value cover for your IP plan. Under an indemnity policy, your insurer bases the monthly benefit you would be paid on your income at the time you make a claim. For an agreed-value policy, the benefit is based on your income when you apply for coverage. Premiums for indemnity cover are usually lower than for an agreed value policy.

But indemnity policies may vary among providers, so speak to your adviser about which cover may suit you. Your adviser may also help you tailor your plan to meet your income protection needs.